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Expert advice from PBO's Mike Coates & marinechandlery.com |  View this email in your browser

* TOP TIPS TUESDAY *

51. PREPARING DECK AND RUNNING GEAR YOUR STEP BY STEP GUIDE BY PBO COLUMNIST MIKE COATES
GUARD RAILS & STANCHIONS

Even though they are ‘staring us in the face’ throughout the season, stanchions and guard rail wires are often items that are overlooked during pre season checks. Stanchions should be checked for security; make sure the base is fastened securely to the deck and/or toe rail, there is no movement and ALL fastenings are in place. An unstable base is not only dangerous - it could possibly lead to a man overboard situation and the mechanical fastening(s) could be the source of a leak into the interior. If the base is found to be loose, remove, clean and re-fit using the appropriate sealant, my recommendation is to go for a polysulphide as against a silicon sealant. Before refastening a stanchion or any other deck fitting make sure you remove any old sealant using Debond Marine Formula, degrease the fitting and deck using acetone or similar and if the hole is not countersunk to accept the sealant do so. Finally, mask both the deck and the base so any excess sealant that is squeezed out as you tighten down can easily be cleaned up. However when bolting down make sure that you don’t squeeze ALL the sealant out, tighten, allow the sealant to set then go for a final turn on the spanner. Check stainless tubular type stanchions where they are drilled (for mid height guard wire to pass through) for signs of stress cracks round the hole. Make sure the stanchion is well secured into its base either by lock nut and bolt or by split pin, however if an alloy stanchion is being secured  with a stainless fastening you must use a barrier to prevent an electrolytic reaction, same if you are using stainless stanchions in aluminium bases isolate between the 2 dissimilar metals. Split pins can be very sharp, likewise the end of a stainless bolt, they should be covered in self amalgamating tape or a blob of clear sealant applied to prevent snagging on footwear, foulies and of course skin!
Guard rail wires should be carefully examined for broken strands especially where the wire exits the swage or Talurit termination and where they pass through stanchions. You will have to slacken each wire and draw it through the stanchion to fully inspect. Flex the wire gently at the start of a termination or where the wire has passed thru a stanchion, If any broken or worn strands are found they MUST be replaced, it’s certainly not recommended & highly dangerous to just tape over them! PVC covered stainless steel guard rail wires (banned some years ago for use on offshore race boats) can hide broken or corroded strands especially where the PVC cover butts up against swage or Talurit terminations. Moisture and a lack of oxygen provide the ideal scenario for crevice corrosion to go unnoticed, any signs of rust in these areas can be a pointer to wire failure thru weakening of the internal wire strands – if rust stains are in evidence  replace without question, preferably with uncovered 1 x 19 strand stainless wire. Ensure all pelican hooks in gates assemblies are free to operate preferably single handed, and that the piston fully engages when closed, lubricate same with a dry film spray or similar. If your method of tensioning the guard rail(s) is a cord lashing by the pushpit we would suggest that this is replaced on a regular basis. Check that all the clevis pinsrings or split pins in the assembly are secure and either tape over to avoid snagging or cover with those rather nice chrome leather boots. If small people or dogs etc are going to be found on board this season and netting is already fitted, examine for signs of degrading through UV exposure and check its secured to both guard rail wires and toe rail, there’s no point in fitting it if your precious cargo can roll under the lower edge!

Once you have finished your inspection of guardrails and stanchions check the security of your bolt on accessories such as the liferaft cradlehorseshoe bracket and while you are in that area, are any electrical cables passing through the pushpit showing signs of chafe.
JACKSTAYS

Whether wire or webbing they should be inspected. Check wire termination, especially PVC covered as per guard rail wires, for corrosion. Webbing jackstays should have their stitching checked for integrity, if any nicks or cuts are found in the webbing or if more than 3-4 years old they should be replaced owing to UV degrading of the material. If replacing wire jackstays consider changing to webbing as an alternative, it is kinder to decks and doesn’t roll under foot!
Jackstay shackle fail
Furling
Deck fittings

Mooring cleats, Fairleads, bollardseye bolts or u-bolts
, like stanchions, should be checked thoroughly for movement. Should you suspect a deck fitting as a source of a leak, the application of a bead of mastic round the edge is only a short term solution! Any shackles securing a block or simiar should all be checked for wear and moused with either monel seizing wire or cable ties for added security. However, if using ties and they have been snipped, watch out for razor sharp edges, use a drop of sealant to cover.
Blocks, Track and Cars

Blocks, especially ball or roller types, should be given a good rinse with fresh water from a hose to remove all traces of grit.  Lubricate ball bearing blocks using Harken's OneDrop Ball Bearing Conditioner or if plain bearing McLube. Don’t use grease as it will attract and hold grit which makes a very effective cutting compound causing wear. DO NOT oil or grease any Tufnol based block or fitting as it causes the material to swell and will seize sheaves onto pins. Any sheaves that are found to have wear between axle and the sheave (either sideways or vertical play) or nicks in the edges of sheaves which will cause damage to sheets or halyards should be replaced. Check all cam jammers on mainsheet block systems if the teeth are worn or the springs have lost their power replace.


Rinse all mainsheet and headsail cars especially those using ball systems with a hose, inspect for wear and lubricate as per blocks. If fitted with plunger stops ensure these are free, lubricate with WD40 or light oil and make sure they locate correctly in the track system. Check all track fastenings for integrity and make sure all track end stops are securely fastened, any rubber pads within the stops should be replaced if worn.
Winches (Halyards & Sheets)

Winches should be stripped and cleaned of all grease, if the grease is hardened it may be necessary to use paraffin and a de-greasing agent. Inspect for wear especially pawls (rounding of the edges and cracking), check for play in all bearings and especially those bearings between drum and the gearbox, if drum can be rocked excessively the caged roller (or plain) bearing is most likely worn. Re assemble using winch grease, don’t use the white stern tube grease as it isn’t suitable for the purpose, and don’t smother parts heavily, a light coating will suffice. Keep grease away from pawls as it will make them stick, only apply a light pawl oil. Replace all pawl springs as a matter of course, a pawl that doesn’t engage through a broken or worn spring subjects the other pawls to overloading which can lead to damage. On self tailing winches check the rope gripper on the top of the winch for signs of wear, if worn replace. A manufacturer’s service kit is recommended as it usually contains most parts that are required for a full service together with an exploded diagram and instructions for stripping and rebuilding the winch.

Rope clutches, often neglected, should be washed thoroughly & checked for holding power, service kits are certainly available for Spinlock, Easy Marine & Barton, other makes no doubt also please check with our staff.
Stanchion mounted fairlead chafe
Headsail furling/reefing systems

A good hosing out of both the upper swivel and the lower drum unit will remove grit and salt deposits, check both items revolve freely on their bearings, if not rinse again, DO NOT attempt  to strip swivels or drum units especially older Furlex units as you will almost certainly lose some of the bearings and possibly damage the retaining circlip(s) during stripping, you may also find it impossible to re assemble the unit without the use of a special press, seek advice regarding this. Only grease systems according to the manufacturers recommendations, some systems use grease others recommend a dry type lubricant. Check the integrity of the furling line especially the knot that secures it to the drum and most importantly are the stanchion leads, if of the sheave type, running freely!
Windlass

Last but not least don’t forget the windlass, out of sight out of mind and you certainly don’t want it to fail if you have to up anchor in a hurry! Despite having a great bunch of guys with a shed load of expert knowledge windlass servicing is not our forte so I make no apologies for reproducing the following maintenance schedule courtesy of Lofrans.
A. Clean all external surfaces and hidden points with fresh water and remove all salt layers.
B. Grease the rotating parts, particularly, the main shaft threads and clutch cones. Check for evidence of corrosion and mechanical stresses. A coat of Boeshield T9 is recommended.
C. Remove and clean the terminals of the electric motor. Coat terminals with Vaseline before re-assembly, then when everything is back in place, spray with Boeshield T9. Test the voltage drop at the terminals.
D. Replace all gaskets.
E. Remove the anchor windlass from the deck with a little help from Debond, clean all salt deposits and the like from under the base and seal again.
LOOK OUT FOR NEXT WEEKS TOP TIPS - SPARS & RIGGING
We hope you find our "Top Tips Tuesday" feature useful and look forward to hearing about the topics you would like covered. Email your suggestions to: toptips@storrarmarine.co.uk. Alternatively, information on a number of topics can be found on our Blog and Knowledge Base as well as on our social media pages, as linked below.
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