CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR THE NEWLY ESTABLISHED JOURNAL Emotions: History, Culture, Society
History of Emotions

Image: The First Day of School, Jean Baptiste Vanmour, c.1720 - c.1737. © Rijksmuseum.

Image: The Letter Writer, Frans van Mieris (I), 1680.  Copyright Rijksmuseum.

The Society for the History of Emotions

The Society for the History of Emotions (SHE) is a project of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, Europe 1100-1800 (CHE).  It is a professional association for scholars interested in emotions as historically and culturally-situated phenomena within past and present societies.

Its aims are:

  • To understand the changing meanings and consequences of emotional concepts, expressions and regulation over time and space;
  • To establish the history of emotions as a widely-used framework for understanding past societies and cultures;
  • To organise conferences and similar events to further knowledge of the history of emotions;
  • To produce a journal called Emotions: History, Culture, Society which will appear in two issues each year;
  • To promote the interests of the Society for the History of Emotions, following the direction of its Council.
The Society welcomes members working in the field of the history of emotions across the world, including independent scholars, early career researchers and postgraduates. Membership information will soon be available through our website but in the meantime please email us at: societyhistoryemotions@gmail.com

Current committee members consist of: Jacqueline Van Gent (Convenor); Giovanni Tarantino (Research Development Officer); Ute Frevert, Miri Rubin, Stephanie Trigg, Paul Yachnin (Ordinary Members); Andrew Lynch and Katie Barclay (Journal Editors).

Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS) Journal

The Society for the History of Emotions, a project of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, 1100-1800, is pleased to announce its new journal Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS). We anticipate that the first issue of the journal will be launched in 2017. The journal, in the first instance, will be published by the Centre for the History of Emotions.

EHCS is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal dedicated to understanding emotions as historically and culturally-situated phenomena and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience, societies, cultures and environments. The editors are now accepting submissions.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. We aim to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualised and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices. We are interested in multidisciplinary approaches (qualitative and quantitative) from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and related disciplines.

We also invite papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts; and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. EHCS also accepts reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

For more details or to submit a contribution, please email:
editemotions@gmail.com


Editors 
Katie Barclay, The University of Adelaide
Andrew Lynch, The University of Western Australia
Regimini Militantis Ecclesiae, Ignatius of Loyola, 1728. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Special Issue on 'Emotion and Change': Emotions: History, Culture, Society

EHCS invites scholars exploring the question ‘What differences do emotions make in processes of change?’ to propose articles for inclusion in a special issue on 'Emotion and Change', to be published in the first half of 2018. 

One of the key issues for scholars who study emotions is the role that they play in processes of social, cultural, historical, political, economic and other forms of change. Particularly relevant to such discussions have been studies of collective or mass emotions and their relationship to social or political movements; the uses of emotion to manipulate groups, such as through mass media, or the key role of affection in childhood development, that plays a significant role in adult life chances and outcomes. Teasing out the role emotion plays in such processes – is it an actor in its own right; a tool to be utilised; or something of both? – remains a significant area of debate in the field. More broadly, an interrogation of emotion can rethink what scholars should look for when assessing change. Is change something that happens at the level of individuals, groups or societies; is feeling enough to mark change or does it have to be followed by action, and if so what counts as action? If emotions are at stake in processes of change, how do they operate to enable change? How is emotion mediated, shared, transformed and put to work? What role do the arts, literature, technology and more play in such emotional processes of change? 

The above questions and discussion are intended to stimulate ideas and generate discussion but should not be viewed as limiting. Contributions are welcome that seek to reimagine the terms of this question to further our understanding of the operation of emotion in human life.

Proposals are now invited for 6,000-8,000 word articles (including notes) that fall under this remit and should include a c.500 word abstract of the proposed submission, a short biography of the author and contact information. Please send proposals and enquiries to editemotions@gmail.com by 31 July 2016. More information will be available shortly on our website.
Copyright © 2016 ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, All rights reserved.
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