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Kathleen Trotter Personal Trainer
September 2014

Introduction

I love being active outside in the fall. The weather is perfect. Especially for running! If you have been contemplating starting to run, now is the time! Before you start, read this month's featured article. In it the fantastic physiotherapist Melanie MacKinnon outlines how you can successfully and safely start to run. Thanks so much Melanie! Stay tuned - part two of Melanie's article will be in October's newsletter!
 
As your trainer, I suggest that you use the change in season and the return to school and / or work as a positive catalyst to re-commit to your health and wellness goals! :-)
 
Make your September goal to start weight training. Before you start, take a look at one of my Globe and Mail fitness videos. Learn how to do proper burpies, or how to perfect your bent over row, or read how to put together an effective arm workout.
 
If you are tempted to "get back on track" by cleansing, first read my latest Huffington Post blog.
 
Lastly, the exercise of the month is the "T Lateral Raise". Try it out and let me know what you think. Enjoy!
 
Don't forget to stay connected with me by following me on Facebook and Twitter!


Exercise of the Month

Lateral Raises With a T Hold
Start with your arms to your sides. Palms facing your body. 

Without shrugging your shoulders, lift your arms up to shoulder height. Slowly release down and repeat ten times.

On your final repetition, hold your arms up at shoulder height. Alternate lowering one arm to your thigh at a time. Do ten reps and then lower both arms down to your legs.

 
 


Article of the Month

Return to Running Progression & Injury Prevention Tips
 
The goal of this program is to help you gradually increase the duration of running, using a combination of walking and running. It’s progressive format will allow your body to adapt to one intensity prior to moving onto the next phase. It also encourages you to be proactive in monitoring how you are feeling and understanding when you body is able to progress or when you should hold off.
 
Most of us are guilty of starting out too fast and too soon and then we wonder why we fall victim to pain in our backs, hips, knees and/or shins. This program is for those who have not been running consistently (2-3x/week) for more than a 6 week period.
 
By following a progression, you will gradually strengthen your bones, cartilage, ligaments, tendons and muscles to tolerate mileage and pace and minimize joint, tendon/muscle pain as well as stress fractures.
 
Prior to each workout ensure you have completed a warm up to get your tissues and cardiovascular system ready to exercise. This may be a 5min fast walk or light bike ride. After each exercise session, ensure you complete a cool down to allow your heart rate to lower slowly and your tissues to cool down. This can also be a 5min walk or light bike ride. If you ever feel any pain that is sharp or if you are lightheaded, dizzy or generally un well, do not continue with the workout and seek medical attention.
 
Week 1 (W1):  1:4 (Walk:Run) for 20 minutes; 3x/week
This is Week 1 (W1).  If 20 minutes it too much for you, then do 5, 10 or 15 minutes until you work up to a 1:4 (Walk:Run) for 20 minutes total time; three times per week.  If 20 minutes sounds too easy, that’s great! But be patient and think of this week like building the foundation to a better running in the coming weeks.
 
Three times a week, walk for 1 minutes followed by a 4 minute run.  During this week, it will be more like a jog than a run. You will repeat this 1:4 interval four times to finish a total time of 20 minutes, 16minutes of which is jogging.  If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total. 
 
Self Assessment:
After W1 at this progression, ask yourself the self assessment questions found in the Injury Prevention Tips at the end of this article. If you answer “NO” to all 3 of these questions, then you can move on to the next progression.  If you answer “YES” to any of the questions, then stay at this progression, seek help if needed and do not progress until all answers are “NO”.
 
W2:  1:5 (Walk:Run) for 20 minutes; 3x/week
You will be adding a minute of Run to this progression.  You will repeat this 1:5 interval four times to finish a total of 20 minutes running.  If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total. 
Complete the self assessment questions before progressing.
 
W3:  1:6 (Walk:Run) for 24 minutes; 3x/week
You will be adding a minute of Run to this progression.  You will repeat this 1:6 interval four times to finish a total of 24 minutes of running.  If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total. 
Complete the self assessment questions before progressing.
 
W4:  1:7 (Walk:Run) for 28 minutes; 3x/week
You will be subtracting a minute of Walk and adding a minute of Run to this progression.  You will repeat this 1:7 interval four times to finish a total of 28 minutes of running.  If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total. 
 
Complete the self assessment questions before progressing.
 
W5:  Run for 25 minutes; 3x/week
Notice and congratulate yourself on the fact that it has taken 4 weeks to progress to a solid steady 25 minute run!  You have built a solid foundation that has limited your chance of injury and you are ready to move on to the second ½ of this program.  At this point it should feel less like a jog and more like running, as your speed she be naturally increasing.  If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total.  
Complete the self assessment questions before progressing.
 
W6:  Run for 30 minutes; 3x/week
If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total.  Complete the self assessment questions before progressing.
 
W7:  Run for 35 minutes; 3x/week
If you want to do more cardio than this, choose to walk, bike, swim, or do elliptical for no more than 40 minutes total.  Complete the self assessment questions before progressing.
 
W8:  Run for 40 minutes; 3x/week
You are now ready to add a long/slow run one day a week (preferably during the weekend) and make sure to have a full day of rest after this run, little or no activity.
 
Melanie MacKinnon, Registered Physiotherapist
PT, FCAMPT, CAFCI, MCPA, HBScKIN, MScPT, MClSc (Manip)      
 
Melanie graduated from the University of Toronto with a Masters in Physiotherapy in 2004. Since then she completed a Masters in Clinical Science in Manipulative Therapy from The University of Western Ontario in 2008. She is a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapists and she currently holds an adjunct lecturer appointment & lab demonstrator position with the University of Toronto. She is also an assistant instructor with the Orthopedic division of the Canadian Association of Physiotherapists. Melanie sees a variety of clients, from office workers, to weekend warriors, to internationally ranked athletes. She uses manual therapy, acupuncture & functional retraining to relieve pain, restore movement and return you to the activities you enjoy.
 
If you think you may have a running related injury or if you would like an assessment in order prevent an injury, you can book an assessment with either the Sports Medicine Doctor or with any of the Physiotherapists at High Performance Sports Medicine (HPSM). We are conveniently located at the Yonge Eglinton Centre. For more information regarding our clinic and our skills please visit www.hpsm.ca. To book an appointment please email hello@hpsm.ca or call 416-486-4776 (HPSM).

 

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Kathleen's Media Updates

How to get stronger (without getting bulky)


Stealth Workout: Elbow Room


The most common bent-over row mistakes


The most common burpie mistakes


How to turn your daily dog walk into a workout


What’s the best way to tone the back of my arms?


Positive Thoughts


There's a Right and a Wrong Way to Do a Cleanse


Stealth Workout: Pillow-powered


Navigating The “Weight-Loss” Roller Coaster


Stealth Workout: The Constant Gardener


Head to the playground for this core-building exercise


Are flip-flops bad for your feet?


Stealth Workout: Pillow Talk
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