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What might happen if more people could create positive change at work  - and in the world?
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Rebel against complacency

Five years ago Carmen and I doodled these ideas about creating change. We realized that Rebels prevent organizations from becoming miserable, complacent cultures where greatness is suffocated.  The world needs Rebels now more than ever.  Keep going. Speak up. Ask for help. Get together and rebel for positive change. Everywhere. (End of of public service message.)

Why do I care so much about helping people speak up and be heard? Why has my labor of love become helping rebels at work?

It didn’t start on this day, but all these years later this incident feeds my determination to help people speak truth to power.

- See more at: http://www.rebelsatwork.com/blog/#sthash.XG7A8Eg5.dpuf

Why do I care so much about helping people speak up and be heard? Why has my labor of love become helping rebels at work?

It didn’t start on this day, but all these years later this incident feeds my determination to help people speak truth to power.

- See more at: http://www.rebelsatwork.com/blog/#sthash.XG7A8Eg5.dpuf

Posts worth reading


The Sting of a Rebel Win: What do you do when your boss or "Harvard Business Review" takes your ideas? We call that a Rebel Win, though it can sting. Here are Lois' ideas on how to manage angry emotions and bounce back.

The Curly Hair Rebel Manifesto:  Straighten your hair to get that first job? How can completely irrelevant attributes of individuals impede their ability to contribute to organizations that badly need their help? Why Rebels don't need to be included. We belong. Carmen's views on why your differences are your superpowers.

We Were Made for These Times: One of the most calming and powerful actions you can do to intervene in a stormy world is to stand up and show your soul. The light of the soul throws sparks, can send up flares, builds signal fires, causes proper matters to catch fire. To display the lantern of soul in shadowy times like these - to be fierce and to show mercy toward others; both are acts of immense bravery and greatest necessity. Wisdom from Clarissa Pinkola Estes, author of "Women Who Run with the Wolves."

Crossing Borders with #PinkSocks: Heart-felt story from healthcare rebel @SimonaQHI:  To some of us, the reminder to tell each other “I see you” and touch someone’s hand is the equivalent of a terrified person crossing the border illegally. But it doesn’t have to be like this. Borders are what we make them of. ..My cousin? Happily living the American Dream in PDX. She crossed her borders and still crosses invisible ones, like all of us. The message is timeless, and it’s all on us: Love more, fear less.

Let Your Workers Rebel: Employee engagement is a problem. To fix it, encourage your workers to break rules and be themselves, says Harvard Business School professor Francesa Gino. In this post she shares research on why employees feel the need to conform, why it's costly to organizations and how to combat it.

7 Days of Working Out Loud: The practice of Working Out Loud is being used by Rebels worldwide to make ideas stronger, build relationships among people with shared purposes, and find more meaning in work. This series of posts by Simon Terry of Change Agents Worldwide is a great introduction to getting started with #WOL.T

Resiliency for Rebels (and everyone else)

This is one of our 12  favorite practices for developing resiliency. Click here to download the ebook.

Janet Reno, Gwen Ifill: Rebels at Work

What makes someone an effective Rebel at Work? Look no further than former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno and journalist Gwen Ifill, both of whom died last week. Intelligent, steadfast, determined, and focused on holding their vocations to the highest standards possible -- and then raising those standards even higher.
Some common rebel mistakes we've been noticing:
  1. Not prioritizing ideas
  2. Failing the pitch meeting
  3. Blowing important conversations (or avoiding them because they're so uncomfortable)
  4. Ignoring personal danger signals
For your Rebel Playlist: "I Don't Want To Change You" by Damien Rice. Because not everything and everyone needs to be changed.
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Rebels at Work, The Shakespeare's Head Building, 21 Meeting St., Providence, RI 0293

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