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Ideas for leading change from within your workplace.
So exactly how LONG should you wait for change?

The other day I (Carmen) was in a conversation with a long-time rebel (first-time caller) who has been tirelessly constructing a radical new work practice for an organization. For years. Except that now he’s gotten kind of tired. Perhaps you might even say fed up. His ideas are not really moving beyond the prototype stage and it’s been…years.

“People keep telling me that ‘Change Takes Time’ but my question is: How much time is TOO LONG?”

As a card-carrying member of the “Change Takes Time Fraternity” I realized I had never asked myself that question. Sure, real change takes time but when does that truth become just empty words for the Status Quo to hide behind?

My friend had worked some of this out for himself.

“Many organizations realized the need to move into a different model at around the same time. A decade ago. Most of them now are well underway into making the transition. Some have completed it. But we’re still futzing around.”

“That’s how I know our change is taking too long.”

Rebels need to have an idea (maybe even a timetable?) for how long it takes to complete certain types of change in comparable organizations. They need to use this information (cleverly) to establish expectations not just for themselves but also for the organization around them. Because in most change initiatives, the Status Quo remains in fact the most important player.

I can imagine it would be quite effective to let the bureaucratic black belts know what the typical transition time is for comparable change initiatives. Status Quo leaders may not always buy the idea for change but they are quite inclined to support the need to keep to a schedule. And talking explicitly about how long you expect something to take and “how long too long is” will also prevent the passive-aggressives in your organization from availing themselves of one of their favorite techniques–using the unmonitored passage of time to wait the rebels out.

Finally, having a clearer framework in your mind to help you determine when change is taking too long will help you avoid rebel burnout. Rebel self-care is essential and yet most rebels are horrible at it. We really do suffer from the sunk costs phenomenon, particularly because our sunk costs usually represent emotional and psychological investments.

Rebels sometimes also need to think about whether they are prepared to stay in their position long enough to see a particular change through. Are you strong enough to hack away at your organization’s undergrowth for let’s say five years to make something happen?  Be honest when you answer that question. Because change takes time.


The other day I was in a conversation with a long-time rebel (first-time caller) who has been tirelessly constructing a radical new work practice for an organization. For years. Except that now he’s gotten kind of tired. Perhaps you might even say fed up. His ideas are not really moving beyond the prototype stage and it’s been…years.

“People keep telling me that ‘Change Takes Time’ but my question is: How much time is TOO LONG?”

As a card-carrying member of the “Change Takes Time Fraternity”, I realized I had never asked myself that question. Sure, real change takes time but when does that truth become just empty words for the Status Quo to hide behind?

My friend had worked some of this out for himself.

“Many organizations realized the need to move into a different model at around the same time. A decade ago. Most of them now are well underway into making the transition. Some have completed it. But we’re still futzing around.”

“That’s how I know our change is taking too long.”

Rebels need to have an idea (maybe even a timetable?) for how long it takes to complete certain types of change in comparable organizations. They need to use this information (cleverly) to establish expectations not just for themselves but also for the organization around them. Because in most change initiatives, the Status Quo remains in fact the most important player.

I can imagine it would be quite effective to let the bureaucratic black belts know what the typical transition time is for comparable change initiatives. Status Quo leaders may not always buy the idea for change but they are quite inclined to support the need to keep to a schedule. And talking explicitly about how long you expect something to take and “how long too long is” will also prevent the passive-aggressives in your organization from availing themselves of one of their favorite techniques–using the unmonitored passage of time to wait the rebels out.

Finally, having a clearer framework in your mind to help you determine when change is taking too long will help you avoid rebel burnout. Rebel self-care is essential and yet most rebels are horrible at it. We really do suffer from the sunk costs phenomenon, particularly because our sunk costs usually represent emotional and psychological investments.

Rebels sometimes also need to think about whether they are prepared to stay in their position long enough to see a particular change through. Are you strong enough to hack away at your organization’s undergrowth for let’s say five years to make something happen?  Be honest when you answer that question. Because change takes time.

- See more at: http://www.rebelsatwork.com/2013/07/04/so-exactly-how-long-should-you-wait-for-change/#sthash.RwuBDMSI.dpuf

The other day I was in a conversation with a long-time rebel (first-time caller) who has been tirelessly constructing a radical new work practice for an organization. For years. Except that now he’s gotten kind of tired. Perhaps you might even say fed up. His ideas are not really moving beyond the prototype stage and it’s been…years.

“People keep telling me that ‘Change Takes Time’ but my question is: How much time is TOO LONG?”

As a card-carrying member of the “Change Takes Time Fraternity”, I realized I had never asked myself that question. Sure, real change takes time but when does that truth become just empty words for the Status Quo to hide behind?

My friend had worked some of this out for himself.

“Many organizations realized the need to move into a different model at around the same time. A decade ago. Most of them now are well underway into making the transition. Some have completed it. But we’re still futzing around.”

“That’s how I know our change is taking too long.”

Rebels need to have an idea (maybe even a timetable?) for how long it takes to complete certain types of change in comparable organizations. They need to use this information (cleverly) to establish expectations not just for themselves but also for the organization around them. Because in most change initiatives, the Status Quo remains in fact the most important player.

I can imagine it would be quite effective to let the bureaucratic black belts know what the typical transition time is for comparable change initiatives. Status Quo leaders may not always buy the idea for change but they are quite inclined to support the need to keep to a schedule. And talking explicitly about how long you expect something to take and “how long too long is” will also prevent the passive-aggressives in your organization from availing themselves of one of their favorite techniques–using the unmonitored passage of time to wait the rebels out.

Finally, having a clearer framework in your mind to help you determine when change is taking too long will help you avoid rebel burnout. Rebel self-care is essential and yet most rebels are horrible at it. We really do suffer from the sunk costs phenomenon, particularly because our sunk costs usually represent emotional and psychological investments.

Rebels sometimes also need to think about whether they are prepared to stay in their position long enough to see a particular change through. Are you strong enough to hack away at your organization’s undergrowth for let’s say five years to make something happen?  Be honest when you answer that question. Because change takes time.

- See more at: http://www.rebelsatwork.com/2013/07/04/so-exactly-how-long-should-you-wait-for-change/#sthash.RwuBDMSI.dpuf
10%: when ideas get adopted 
Jefferson and Gorbachev both said that the revolution ignites when 5% of thinking people arrive at the same idea. But
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
scientists from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute have found that once committed opinion holders reach 10% the ideas will always be adopted by the majority. For those of us leading change, that means we need to get 10% of the majority behind the cause.  If you're in a company with 1,000 people, you need 100 who are behind the issue. If you live in a town with 30,000 people, you need 3,000 committed people.  For more on this fascinating research study, click here.

Three words that will transform your career: Help this person
This post by Bruce Kasanoff, author of Smart Customers, Stupid Companies, is worth a read. Good lesson for work and life.


What we're reading

Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection by MIT's Ethan Zuckerman.
Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think by Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier
Exit, Voice & Loyalty by Albert Hirschman
Transatlantic by Colum McCann


What's your story?
Check out stories by rebels at work. We'd love to share yours, too. It's one small way you can help inspire others to step up and create change that matters at work.

Carmen Medina

Lois Kelly

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