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Volume 20, Issue 38                          October 8, 2015
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Ron Paul
WELCOME to the Liberator Online!

In This Issue
FROM ME TO YOU 
We've Got to DO SOMETHING!
NEWS YOU CAN USE 
US Military Bombs Doctors Without Borders Hospital in Afghanistan
When Will the EPA Adequately Clean Up Its Mess?
#BigGovernmentStrikesAgain
#FreedomPrevails
QUOTABLE
See what Marco Rubio, Judge Andrew Napolitano, Hillary Clinton, Tim Cook and John Mackey have to say about trade, privacy, transparency, gun control and democracy.
CONVERSATIONS WITH MY BOYS
Respectability Politics and Discrimination
WHAT'S HAPPENING WITH THE ADVOCATES
Find out how to get a FREE OPH KIT for your libertarian student group
See what SPECIAL THANK-YOU GIFTS we've reserved for supporters just like you. Ready to have a libertarian communication event near you? Find out how.
How much is Liberty worth?

Executive Director Brett Bittner
From Me To You

by Brett Bittner

We've Got to DO SOMETHING!


It’s almost formulaic at this point.

DO SOMETHINGSomething tragic or disastrous occurs, emotions run high, policymakers see an opportunity to raise their profile, and BOOM! WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING!

As libertarians, we are slow to embrace the populist messaging in the wake of a disaster or tragedy. Statistically, these events have a occurrence frequency near zero. With natural disasters like hurricanes, there is even be a significant warning ahead of the disaster. Yet the call for action, to DO SOMETHING, to do ANYTHING grows louder with occurrence.

Libertarians tend to examine potential outcomes rather than the intent of an action. With the initial “feel good” sentiment, an idea floated to address the recent tragedy or disaster gains traction among the masses, despite no real evidence of need or effectiveness.

So, how do we combat the desire to DO SOMETHING?

What I do:

  1. Keep calm. In my experience, the worst time to act is in an immediate response to something that does not pose an immediate threat. By calmly and rationally examining a situation, its effects, the likely consequences (intended and unintended) of proposals, and the actual outcomes of similar actions elsewhere and in other facets of humanity. Usually, cooler heads prevail, so it’s in our best interest to remain the coolest and calmest in a discussion.
  2. Focus on the facts. Despite the efforts of others to make an issue or proposed action emotional, keep your focus on the rarity of the situation, the likely consequences of a proposed solution, and that laws and ordinances only affect the rational and law-abiding. 
  3. Listen to the concerns of others. If you aren’t listening, how can you really address the concerns of those interested in the topic?
  4. Talk WITH others. This is a accompaniment to #3, as we are often quick to give our ideas without having an actual discussion to reach consensus.
  5. Have a solution. In last week’s column, I pointed to the importance of having a solution. In short, I discussed how having a solution or alternative will remind others that your continued inclusion in the conversation is vital to solving the issue at hand. You don’t need an immediate reaction to solve a problem. In fact, patience and focusing on root causes will earn your seat at the table. One key here is to keep your comments within the Overton Window for the issue at hand.


So, when those who are motivated for someone to DO SOMETHING, you have a few things to help you mitigate that emotional response to drive the conversation toward your libertarian solution.

Walk the walk,
Brett_Signature.png
 
Liberty Library

News You Can Use

Written & Compiled by Advocates Staff

US Military Bombs Doctors Without Borders Hospital in Afghanistan


On Saturday, Oct. 3, a Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan was bombed accidentally after Afghan forces called for air support from the American military, Gen. John Campbell, the commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, said Monday.

doctors without borders hospital bombedThe airstrike killed 12 medical staff members and at least 10 patients, three of them children, Doctors Without Borders said.

“We have now learned that on October 3, Afghan forces advised that they were taking fire from enemy positions and asked for air support from U.S. forces,” he said. “An airstrike was then called to eliminate the Taliban threat, and several innocent civilians were accidentally struck.”

Read more about the effects of the airstrike here..
 

When Will the EPA Adequately Clean Up Its Mess?
 

On Sept. 2, the Environmental Protection Agency officials released new data that indicates that surface water concentrations from the Animas River are returning back to normal.

Samples collected on Aug. 16 and 17 “have been validated,” the agency said.

animasThe EPA review of the data included a comparison to screening levels for exposure during recreational river use to see if the metal concentrations in the water are consistent with levels prior to the disastrous 3 million-gallon spill that contaminated the river in early August.

Read more about the aftermath here..

#BigGovernmentStrikesAgain 

#FreedomPrevails

Israeli Google Lunar X Prize team books rocket - BBC News
Purdue Calumet Eliminates All of Its Speech Codes, Earns FIRE’s Highest Free Speech Rating - FIRE
For the first time, less than 10 percent of the world is living in extreme poverty - The Washington Post

News You Can Use is written and compiled by staff at the Advocates for Self-Government. 

Quotable
Bits and Bytes From Across the Spectrum
 
MAINTAINING TRUST: "We see that privacy is a fundamental human right that people have. We are going to do everything that we can to help maintain that trust." â€” Tim Cook, Apple CEO, October 1, 2015

TRANSPARENCY: "I'm the most transparent person in American history." â€” Hillary Clinton, 2016 Presidential Candidate, September 30, 2015

HOW DO YOU STOP A MADMAN?: "The police cannot stop mass killings, because they cannot be everywhere all the time. And madmen willing to kill do not fear being lawbreakers."  — Judge Andrew Napolitano, Fox News Contributor, October 8, 2015

"Quotable" is compiled by members of the Advocates staff.
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The Libertarian Homeschooler
Conversations with My Boys

By The Libertarian Homeschooler


Respectability Politics and Discrimination


Me: Tell me about Respectability Politics.
Young Statesman (14): It’s basically making excuses for cultural prejudices. “If they were more respectable then this bad thing wouldn’t be happening.”
discriminationMe: Who can Respectability Politics be used against?
YS: Minorities.
Me: Just race?
YS: No. The poor. Muslims. Anyone different from you.
Me: The assumption in Respectability Politics is that the group that is being discriminated against….
YS: …is doing it to themselves. It’s never the discriminating group’s problem. They bring the discrimination upon themselves. If they were more respectable then this wouldn’t be happening. If they changed what they did then they wouldn’t be discriminated against.
Me: Have you ever heard the expression “victim blaming”?

Read what the Young Statesman had to say here...


The Libertarian Homeschooler is the mother of two boys, 14 and 10. You can connect with the homeschooling community she has created here.

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