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Bigger, Better
2014 Calendar


This is the year that the Happy Endings Rescue Calendar gets super-sized.  We're moving to a 12" x 12" format  so we can fit more dog photos into every month and feature an extra large shot of our very favorite photo.  If you liked the calendar before, you will love the bigger, better calendar even more. 

We've got several months ahead of us to put it all together, but you don't.  Although we will accept photo submissions until August 31 we'll have a pretty good idea of what photos will be in there before the final submission date rolls around. It'
s not too early to snap some pictures and send them in with your calendar order. Don't wait until the August 31 deadline when  it may be too late. 

The cost is $30 to submit a photo, enter the Top Dog Cover Contest and get the 14-month calendar delivered to your door.  When the cover contest starts on August 1, ask your friends and relatives to vote your dog Top Dog. You can lean more about the calendar and cover contest by clicking here.

Reading Rover

A lot has been said and written about human body language, but how much thought do we give to reading our dog's canine body language? Pyrs have very expressive faces and all dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and intentions to others around them.  Although dogs use sounds and signals too, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. Being able to “read” your dog’s postures and signals will make it easier to understand your pet's feelings and motivations so you can predict what he’s likely to do.

Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpuf
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpuf
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpuf
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpuf
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpufvv
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpuf
Dogs have a language that allows them to communicate their emotional state and their intentions to others around them. Although dogs do use sounds and signals, much of the information that they send is through their body language, specifically their facial expressions and body postures. - See more at: http://moderndogmagazine.com/articles/how-read-your-dogs-body-language/415#sthash.0q98sqwM.dpuf
A neutral or calm dog has a relaxed body posture. The tail may be down and relaxed or wagging. The dogs ears will be up, head held high with the mouth open slightly and the tongue exposed. The dog will have a loose stance and carry the weight flat on his/her  feet. Facial expressions, ear set, tail carriage and overall demeanor will all signal the dog's intentions and feelings

 
A dominant or assertive dog tries to make himself look large. His muscles will be tense and and he will stand tall  with a forward posture and tail held high. Other indicators of dominance include ears forward, nose wrinkled, lips curled.  The  teeth and gums may be visible with the mouth open and c-shaped and the dog has a stiff-legged stance with the body-leaning forward and a stiff tail that can quiver or vibrate with agitation.
 
A scared dog will be hunched as though trying to look small. He might lower his body or even cower on the ground. His head will be held low as well. If he’s frightened by something or someone, he’ll recoil away from it. Ears are back, forehead is smooth and eye contact is brief. The tail is held down and between the legs.
 
An excited dog is ready to pounce or chase, and may raise a paw in the air. Back legs are bent, the tail is down and the ears are up. The dog's mouth may be open with the tongue exposed. There are nine defined canine body language poses including submissive, alert, anxious, relaxed and playful.  For illustrations of all the poses, visit Dogs for Defense K-9 and for more information on Canine Body Language go to the ASPCA page on Canine Body Language.

Busy, Busy

We've seen a 25% spike in the number of NGPR adoptions on the East coast as we close out the first half of 2013, with 174 Pyrs and Pyr mixes finding homes through our adoption process. Nationwide including Texas, Oklahoma and the West Coast, 362 dogs have been rehomed. Things show no sign of slowing down as we enter the summer months with the shelters packed and the number of owner surrenders swelling, as some people turn to shelters and rescues rather than boarding their dogs when they go on vacation. 

With our increased workload we are looking for volunteers not only to foster but to help with the administrative work load as well.  We are having a rescue orientation phone in conference at 8 pm on Tuesday, July 8.  If you would like to attend to learn more about what we do and how we do it, email
Jodi for an invite. 

We just completed our first state-mandated financial review this year and are happy to report that NGPR is in good standing with New York State and the Federal Government as an incorporated 501-c-3 non-profit. Click on the links to see the accountant's letter or
report
which shows that 80% of our expenditures go to medical, boarding and transport. Please keep us in mind for your tax-deductible, charitable giving as we continue to meet the growing needs of Pyr rescue.


Love Letters to Rescue

"Casper (formerly Louie) came to us from the National Great Pyrenees Rescue in October 2011.  Our second dog recently died and we knew that Casper needed a companion, so on May 18 we adopted Abby (formerly Girl) from (NGPR-affiliated) Indy Great Pyrenees Rescue. Casper is now 2 years old and weighs about 120 pounds.  Abby is a 3 1/2 year old Pyr/border collie mix who weighs about 54 pounds. 

The two have bonded beautifully and are so happy together, as you can see from the photo of them together on the same dog bed.  During our afternoon “dog time” in the yard, she herds Casper in full border collie style and amazes us with her agility.  There is good give-and-take between the two of them as first one initiates play and then the other. They also enjoy just lying next to each other and doing some light mouthing and pawing that seems more affectionate and playful than anything else. They have settled into their daily routine very well and obviously enjoy each other’s company.  We are thrilled for both of them and for us. What a happy household!

Thanks to everyone who made this possible—rescue staff, foster parents, volunteer drivers and other rescue volunteers!
             -- Judith in PA

Hungry Dogs

A fact of life in rescue and one that we many of us have just come to accept that is that many of our Pyr and Pyr mixes come into rescue half, if not completely starved.  The plight of a dog named Bones in a South Carolina shelter two weeks ago brought home that sad and tragic fact. As it turns out, Bones was not intentionally starved or a stray.  He had a medical condition that did not allow him to properly digest and process his food.  We agreed to be his sponsor and NGPR and Pyr supporters came forward with $1700 in donations to cover his medical expenses in a couple of days.   The outpouring of support for this one dog made us realize that everyone may not know that many of the dogs coming into rescue have been deprived of proper nourishment as they wander about, others have not been properly fed for their entire lives.  Rescue goes out of our way to provide these dogs with the nutrition and medical care they require to get back on the road to health.  These are the "everyday" neediest cases and we are seeing more and more of them. Pyr rescue needs your support, not only to feed the large number of emaciated dogs coming into rescue, but to deal with the long term medical needs of our hungriest, neediest cases.  Please make a donation to help feed our hungriest cases or go to our contacts page to support the efforts of the Pyr rescue in your state.
Copyright © 2013 National Great Pyrenees Rescue

Email Updates for National Pyr Volunteers and Adopters

Our mailing address is:

National Great Pyrenees Rescue
P.O. Box 214
Maplecrest, NY 12454

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