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A special, quarterly newsletter from InsideClimate News

UPDATE: Big news! ICN has been named a Pulitzer Prize finalist in the prestigious Public Service category for our investigation of Exxon's 40-year history with climate science. Read more here.
Welcome to ICN's new quarterly newsletter, where we give you a look back at our most rewarding work and an inside peek at how we make it happen.
Although our Exxon: The Road Not Taken series launched last September, its momentum continues. Not only have the original stories won a series of journalism awards, they helped kick-start a push to investigate whether Exxon misled the public and investors on climate, with several states and the U.S. Virgin Islands now joining New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman in the effort. 
The work is far from over. A new series of articles that started this week examines the oil industry’s early concern with air pollutants, including smog and CO2, and how it confronted those emerging issues. Reporter Neela Banerjee talks about the Exxon work, and the overwhelming response to it, in our first installment of the Insider Q&A.
The work is far from over. A new series of articles that started last week examines the oil industry’s early concern with air pollutants, including smog and CO2, and how it confronted those emerging issues. Reporter Neela Banerjee talks about the Exxon work, and the overwhelming response to it, in our first installment of the Insider Q&A.

Five Questions With: Neela Banerjee

Q: When you started on the Exxon series, did you have any idea what the reaction would be to it?

BANERJEE: People write to me about the series, or see it on social media and respond and I continue to be surprised. When we were in the middle of it, looking at all the documents and putting together the stories, the work was interesting and it was rewarding to do this kind of investigative work. But I thought we would get a reaction in the climate-nerd world—the scientists, the environmental groups, the advocacy groups who really care about this stuff. I thought the general public would not notice. I did not expect the calls from Congress to investigate, the AGs getting involved. Every time a new one of these crops up I’m like, whoa.

Climate change is one of these things that, for those of us who care about it, the challenge is how do you get people to care? Clearly, this is something that got people to care.

READ THE FULL Q&A ON MEDIUM

Exxon Investigation Honored With 7 Awards

Pulitzer Prize (Finalist, Public Service)
• 
National Press Foundation (Winner, Thomas L. Stokes Award for Best Energy Writing)
The Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting (Finalist)
The Izzy Award (Winner)
Scripps Howard Awards (Winner, Environmental Reporting)
SABEW (Co-winner, Digital Investigative Division 1; finalist, Energy)
Deadline Club (Finalist, Science, Technology, Medical or Environmental Reporting, winners announced in May)

Exxon Investigation in The New York Review of Books

"What should we think of a corporation that undertakes research on one of its products only to discover that its use could be damaging—and then tries to conceal the potential dangers of that product’s use?"

Storified: ICN responds to Exxon


In an 18-part tweetstorm, we respond to Exxon's criticisms against ICN and our investigative stories.

Got some catching up to do?


Read all of our #ExxonKnew (and related) stories here.

And don't miss our comprehensive coverage of the Aliso Canyon methane leak here. 

Beyond Exxon: Other Feature Stories From ICN

Is the IOGCC, Created by Congress in 1935, Now a Secret Oil and Gas Lobby?
BY: LISA SONG

In 1978, the DOJ told Congress IOGCC should be disbanded. It wasn't. In 2005, the group claimed credit for the Halliburton loophole after ‘years of hard work.'
Credit: Getty Images

Fracking Study Finds Toxins in Wyoming Town's Groundwater and Raises Broader Concerns
BY: NEELA BANERJEE

Study also finds companies fracked into underground sources of water and at much shallower depths than previously known, close to drinking water wells.
Credit: Pavillion Area Concerned Citizens

A Tale of Two Leaks: Fixed in California, Ignored in Alabama
BY: NEELA BANERJEE

Eight years after a mercaptan spill in Eight Mile, its mostly black and working class residents still suffer from respiratory issues, rashes and headaches.

Rising Seas Pull Fort Lauderdale, Florida's Building Boomtown, Toward a Bust
BY: KATHERINE BAGLEY

The Venice of America is expecting its population to grow by a third, but it already can't handle the impacts of climate change.

ICN in the News: Partnerships and Appearances

Alabama Media: "A Tale of Two Leaks: Fixed in California, Ignored in Alabama," by Neela Banerjee, ran on the Sunday front page of the Mobile Press-Register and the Birmingham News, as well as on AL.com.
Living on Earth: Katherine Bagley was interviewed about her story, "Rising Seas Pull Fort Lauderdale, Florida's Building Boomtown, Toward a Bust."
On the Media: David Hasemyer talked about his coverage of the Zika Virus and its link to climate change.
Audubon: ICN and Audobon began a new publishing partnership.
Mindbodygreen: ICN launched a partnership with the popular lifestyle site, which runs our infographics and stories.

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