ACT Drug Action Week 2013 Launch Follow Up
ATODA eBulletin - www.atoda.org.au



ACT Drug Action Week 2013 Launch Follow Up



Presentations / Report / Resources



On 14 June 2013 the launch of ACT Drug Action Week 2013 was held at the ACT Legislative Assembly. It aimed to acknowledge the contributions of families and friends in our community, discuss the issues affecting families and showcase ACT alcohol, tobacco and other drug support and services for families.

ATODA would like to warmly thank the speakers and all the attendees for their participation in this event.

This eBulletin offers a follow up from the launch to provide links to the resources and tools mentioned by the various speakers.



Presentations

ATODA would like also to thank Mrs Agnes Shea OAM, Ngunnawal Elder, who did a Welcome to Country and Dr Chris Bourke MLA who officially launched ACT Drug Action Week. They were followed by Dr Stefan Gruenert and Mr Tony Trimingham's who kindly shared their experiences and expertise.


Drugs, Communities, Families! - Dr. Stefan Gruenert’s presentation


Biography
Dr Stefan Gruenert is the Chief Executive Officer at Odyssey House Victoria. He is a registered psychologist with more than 13 years experience in the drug and alcohol sector as a clinician, supervisor, researcher, and senior manager.
For Dr. Stefan Gruenert’s complete profile visit the Odyssey House Victoria website
 
Summary of presentation
Dr Gruenert’s presentation emphasised that all clients have families of various shapes and sizes and it is essential to consider their needs and resources in treatment and intervention approaches.  He noted that addressing family, child and parenting issues are critical to sustainable solutions as it improves outcomes.
 
Dr Gruenert continued by referencing two Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD) publications (see Reports and publications) to help workers better assess the situation and then provide adequate interventions when responding to cases where either the parent or child is experiencing ATOD problems.
 
To demonstrate the relationship between family need and staff practice, he discussed the Pyramid of family Care/Needs (see Reports and publications) highlighting how staff are able to respond from initial screening to parenting and child therapy. He further highlighted what works with families from informal conversations to targeted programs.
 
He finished by talking about family violence and available resources and the possible outcomes of Family Drug Treatment Courts.

For more information: Download Dr Gruenert’s presentation


Supporting Families - Mr Tony Trimingham’s presentation
 
Biography
Mr Tony Trimingham is the CEO of Family Drug Support which he started after receiving many phone calls from families affected by illicit drugs after he went public about the death of his son from heroin drug overdose.
He has worked for the last 30 years as a counsellor, a group leader and a psychotherapist.
For more information about Mr Tony Trimingham, visit the Family Drug Support website or see the OfSubstance magazine
 
Summary of presentation
Mr Tony Trimingham’s shared his story about the death of his son and how it has affected his life but also how it has brought him into helping other families struggling with a loved one’s drug problem.  He discussed how Family Drug Support and other resources have and are still helping families. He shared not only his own personal story but also testimonies from other family members who sought help.
Mr Tony Trimingham recently published a book “Not my Family, Never my Child: What to do if someone you love is a drug user” (see Reports and publications) with a focus on helping, supporting and coping with a family member’s drug problem.  He took the opportunity to talk about his book as other resources available for families.
 
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Reports and publications


Drug use in the family: impacts and implications for children
Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD)
This report focuses on the number of Australian children living in households affected by alcohol or drugs, the issues they face and how we can improve this situation.
One of the most important findings from the report highlights that families with parental substance abuse are also families that have many other complex life problems. These include mental illness, a history of abuse and neglect and poverty and child behaviour problems.
 
For more information: Download the report or visit the ANCD website
 
Reference: Dawe, S, Frye, S, Best, D, Moss, D, Atkinson, J, Evans, C, Lynch, M & Harnett, P 2007, Drug use in the family: impacts and implications for children, ANCD Research Paper; 13, report prepared for Australian National Council on Drugs, Canberra, ACT. ISBN: 9781877018169
 
 
Supporting the families of young people with problematic drug use: investigating support options

Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD)
The report argues that family members should be able to get support and assistance in their own right and highlights that many family members helping people with drug or alcohol issues frequently aren’t getting the right information or support — and end up feeling isolated and confused. It also highlights that many Australian families are now routinely faced with a young person with binge drinking problems — often creating enormous pressures on the family. An Australian National Council on Drugs phone survey has found that many treatment providers in Australia do not have the resources to provide any direct services for family members who have a young person with alcohol or drug issues.
 
For more information: Download the report or visit the ANCD website
 
Reference: Frye, S. et al. (2007), Supporting the families of young people with problematic drug use: investigating support options, ANCD Research Paper; 15, report prepared for Australian National Council on Drugs, Canberra, ACT. ISBN: 9781877018183
 
 
The Pyramid of Family Care: A framework for family involvement with adult mental health services
Working with families of patients with severe mental illness has proven to be effective in reducing the relapse rate for patients and the distress level of families. However, there is no general framework available for adult mental health professionals on incorporating family work in their everyday practice. The Pyramid of Family Care discussed in this paper is based on the same conceptual work as Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. The bottom levels include the family's basic needs for information about the illness and orientation to the mental health service. This contrasts with the top level which represents complex needs for interventions such as intensive family therapy. The paper expands on this model of family care. The different levels of the Pyramid are discussed and a minimum level of care defined.
 
For more information: Download the article
 
Reference: Mottaghipour, Y., & Bickerton, A. (2005) “The Pyramid of Family Care: A framework for family involvement with adult mental health services”, Advances in Mental Health, 4:3, pp. 210-217.
 
 
Research Update on Family Drug Courts: Need to Know
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
This article discusses the effectiveness, costs, target population, best practices and outcomes related to family drug courts.
For more information: Download the article, or visit the NADCP website
 
Reference: Marlowe, D.B. & Carey, S.M. (2012) “Research Update on Family Drug Courts: Need to Know”, Alexandria, VA: National Drug Court Institute.
 
Not my Family, Never my Child: What to do if someone you love is a drug user
The book provides support, advice and guidance to the parents, siblings, loved ones and the users themselves through the difficult journey of drug dependency. It includes detailed information on warning signs, early intervention, coping and survival strategies, treatment and where to go for additional advice and support.
 
Reference: Trimingham, T. & Halliday, C. 2009, Not my Family, Never my Child: What to do if someone you love is a drug user, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, Australia. ISBN 1741755255
 
 
Other links
http://www.ancd.org.au/Publications-and-Reports/publications.html
http://www.odyssey.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=72&Itemid=116


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Resources, Programs and Activities
 
Services and programs (including interstate programs)
 
Families and Friends for Drug Law Reform (FFDLR)
Families and Friends for Drug Law Reform was formed as a direct result of heroin related deaths in the Australian Capital Territory. It believes that prohibition laws are more the problem than the solution. It seeks alternative laws and policies that substantially reduce the deaths and minimise the health and social harm to users, families and society.
For more information: Visit the FFDLR website
 
Family Drug Support
Family Drug Support was formed in 1997 and since its beginning it has aimed to assist families throughout Australia to deal with alcohol and drug issues in a way that strengthens relationships and achieves positive outcomes. They also provide a 24-hour support line for families on 1300 368 186.
For more information: Visit the Family Drug Support website
 
The ACT ATOD Services Directory
Alcohol Tobacco & Other Drug Association ACT (ATODA)
The ACT ATOD Services Directory communicates the diverse range of services and programs available in the ACT alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) sector. For each program, it provides information on the extent and types of support that is available for families and carers.
For more information: Visit the Directory website
 
Mirror Families

Post Placement Support Service (PPSS), Victoria
Mirror Families™ is an innovative approach to creating and extending lifelong community connections for children and young people, with the aim of increasing stability, connectedness, a sense of belonging and the likelihood of positive long term outcomes.
The Mirror Families model aims to create an enduring 'extended family' for vulnerable young people, based on an existing 'heart connection'. This occurs in consultation with the young person and their parent or carer. The intent is to 'mirror' what occurs in natural extended families, where children benefit from long-term relationships, and experience a sense of belonging.
The PPSS Mirror Families Consultancy Service offers consultancy, training and resources for caseworkers and service managers, including assistance with program development to adapt the model to different service contexts.
For more information: Visit the PPSS website, email info@ppss.org.au, or call (03) 9020 1833
 
The Bouverie Centre, Victoria’s family institute
LaTrobe University, Faculty of Health Science
The Bouverie Centre, Victoria’s Family Institute focuses on the important role of the family and the power of relationships to foster social, emotional and mental wellbeing for at risk individuals and their families and for the community at large.
For more information: Visit the Bouverie Centre website, email bouverie.centre@latrobe.edu.au or call (03) 9385 8100
 
Tuning into Kids
University of Melbourne
Tuning in to Kids™ is a 6-session group parenting program that helps children learn to understand and regulate their emotions. The ideas and techniques taught in the program are useful for parents of children of all ages, but are particularly relevant for parents of preschoolers.
For more information: Visit the Tuning into Kids website, or call (03) 9371 0200
 
Nar-Anon Family Groups
Nar-Anon Australia
Al-Anon Family Groups are self-help support Groups for families and friends of compulsive drug users.
For more information: Visit the Nar-Anon Australia website, email serenity@naranon.com.au, or call (02) 8004 1214
 
Al-Anon Family Groups
Al-Anon Australia
The purpose of Al-Anon is to help families and friends of alcoholics recover from the effects of living with someone whose drinking is a problem.
For more information: Visit the Al-Anon Australia website, email agdo@alphalink.com.au, or call (03) 9620 2166
 
Family Drug Help 
Family Drug Help, Victoria
Family Drug Help offers family members support, information, education, inspiration and the encouragement to practice self-care.
For more information: Visit the Family Drug Help website, email fdh@sharc.org.au, or call the Helpline 1300 660 068
 
 
 
Toolkit
 
A Family Sensitive Policy and Practice Toolkit
National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University
This toolkit aims to minimise cases of child abuse or neglect by increasing collaboration between child and adult service agencies. It is a new initiative developed by NCETA to improve the safety and welfare of children with parents who misuse alcohol or drugs. The toolkit builds a bridge between the alcohol and other drugs (AOD) treatment and child protection sectors to improve cooperation and collaboration.
 
For more information or to get a copy: Contact ATODA, that has some free hard copies to offer, by email info@atoda.org.au or call (02) 6255 4070. Also visit the NCETA website
 
Can I ask? An alcohol and drug clinician’s guide to addressing family and domestic violence
National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA),
This resource explores the relationship relationship between alcohol and other drugs (AOD) and family and domestic violence (FDV). It focuses on identifying how the AOD sector can better support clients who have co-occurring AOD and FDV issues, and minimise associated harms experienced by their children.
 
Reference: White, M., Roche, A., Nicholas, R., Long, C., Gruenert, S. & Battams, S. (2012) Can I ask? An alcohol and drug clinician’s guide to addressing family and domestic violence, National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University, Adelaide,
 
For more information: Download a copy of ‘Can I ask?’, or visit the NCETA website
White, M., Roche, A., Nicholas, R., Long, C., Gruenert, S. & Battams, S. (2012) Can I ask? An alcohol and drug clinician’s guide to addressing family and domestic violence, National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University, Adelaide,
 
 
 
Remembrance Ceremony
 

Annual Remembrance Ceremony
Families and Friends for Drug Law Reform (FFDLR)
Every year FFDLR invites members and other families and friends who lost a loved one to attend a Memorial and Remembrance Ceremony to share memories and reflections about their loss. The next celebration should be later this spring.
For more information: Visit the FFDLR website

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Contact ATODA:

Phone: (02) 6255 4070
Fax: (02) 6255 4649
Email: info@atoda.org.au
Mail: PO Box 7187,
Watson ACT 2602
Visit: 350 Antill St. Watson

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The Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Association ACT (ATODA) is the peak body representing the non-government and government alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) sector in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). ATODA seeks to promote health through the prevention and reduction of the harms associated with ATOD. 

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