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DACS
Your flagship visual artists’ rights organisation.
 
Welcome to the 2nd edition of the DACS Legal and Policy Library newsletter – your monthly reading list on the latest legal, political and policy developments relevant to DACS’ members and our community across copyright, IP and the arts from the UK, EU and abroad.

DACS IN ACTION

Campaigning for artists’ rights and work with our partners
DACS updated the CISAC Communications Group on the latest Artist’s Resale Right campaign developments in the UK as well as supporting further activity on an international resale right.  
 
DACS has also been hitting the streets of Whitehall in April, meeting with officials in the Department for International Trade to discuss copyright and IP concerns for future free trade agreements. 

COPYRIGHT

News stories on our favourite topic
WIPO celebrated World IP Day this month with a focus on women in innovation and creativity. Check out their interviews with women working in the IP industries. Inspiring stuff!

Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for IP, Pete Wishart MP, also made sure MPs were paying attention to World IP Day in a statement to the House.
 
The European Commission published a Notice to Stakeholders on the EU rules in the field of copyright. Law firm Taylor Wessing gives us the breakdown.
 
European creators’ organisations, including CISAC, sent an open letter to the European Commission raising concerns over three proposals in the forthcoming Copyright Directive.
 

ARTS, CULTURE AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

Latest developments across arts and culture
The art world has some work to do on the gender pay gap. Figures submitted to the Government Equalities Office showed the UK art industry is performing worse than some other sectors and the top UK action houses pay women between 22% - 37% less than men. Let’s get to work!
 
Online art sales rose to $4.22 billion in 2017 but the pace of growth is slowing. Find out more in Hiscox’ annual Online Art Trade Report.
 
Art imports slump 21% due to the falling pound off of Brexit uncertainty while exports to China rise by 350% according to new custom figures from HMRC.
 
Welcome to the 183 new arts and culture organisations that have been added to the Arts Council England’s 2018-22 National Portfolio. Well done.
 
Arts education gets a boost with £96 million in funding to provide specialist education and training supported by Schools Minister Nick Gibb MP and Arts Council England, British Film Institute and Historic England. 
 
However, Creative Industries Federation, backed by 59 organisations, said the initiative doesn’t go far enough and published a letter in the Telegraph calling for arts education for all. 
 
More funding news – Museums and galleries can apply for a share of £4 million from the DCMS Wolfson Fund to enhance exhibition space and accessibility.
 
New enquiries alert! All four of the UK’s art councils launched an enquiry into planning, tax and funding reform to improve cultural cities. Closes 30 May.
 
Also, as part of the HM Treasury enquiry, Creative Industries Federation is also seeking views on tax relief for creative freelancers and the self-employed.
 
Missed the London Blockchain conference hosted by the Law Society this month? Here’s Matt Hancock’s speech outlining blockchain opportunities for finance, government services and regulatory systems.
 
All about Artificial Intelligence!
 
The House of Lords Artificial Intelligence Committee published a new report, AI in the UK: ready, willing, able?. Spoiler – the UK could lead the global AI revolution.
 
Government and the AI sector also launched their AI sector deal as part of the UK’s Industrial Strategy. Read speeches by DCMS Secretary Matt Hancock MP and Digital and Creative Industries Minister Margot James MP.
 
Over on Lexology, an article explores the issues around AI and copyright.
 

BREXIT IN BRIEF

Whether you can’t get enough Brexit news or if you’re only looking for a brief monthly recap

Brexit took a bit of a backseat this month.
 
Parliament was on recess for the first half of April and Government was preoccupied with quite serious and sensitive political and world developments from Syrian airstrikes, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, to the Windrush generation immigration scandal.
 
So what’s happened this month?
 
New Norwegians? The House of Commons Brexit Select Committee published a controversial report stating the PM shouldn’t rule out a Norway-style EU deal of accepting an EEA agreement, which lead to a fresh row with Brexit supporting MPs led by Jacob Rees-Mogg MP. Also, Exiting the EU Secretary David Davis MP has already ruled out accepting an EEA deal.
 
DexEU vs. No 10?  David Davis MP also clashed with Theresa May’s chief Brexit negotiator, Olly Robbins, over how much detail in the negotiations would be agreed by next March. Davis is pushing departments to come up with detailed proposals for a future trade relationship with the EU, while Robbins apparently is positioning for a broad, high-level agreement.
 
Talks in Brussels continue. When Parliament returned from recess, a three-day series of talks were held in Brussels focusing on the withdrawal agreement, transition period details and the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland.
 
Next scheduled talks start from the 30 April and will ramp up over the summer months.
 
Big defeats in the Lords. Government lost two big votes during the House of Lords report stage of the EU Withdrawal Bill over the Irish Border and the EU Customs Union. Government responded saying the UK’s policy has been clear in that the UK is leaving the customs union.
 
European Withdrawal Bill will move to the Third Reading on 16 May.
 
Stay tuned for more.
 

LEGAL LIBRARY

A round up of interesting cases from the UK, the EU Court of Justice and all over the world
An Italian court considers whether moral rights are infringed when an architectural project is modified.

I’ve gibbon it a lot of thought: US court opines that Naruto the macaque can’t own copyright in the famous ‘monkey selfie’ photograph.
 
IPTV service SET TV is being sued by Netflix, Amazon and film studios for allowing mass copyright infringement.
 
Thanks for reading the DACS Legal and Policy Library.
We’ll see you next month!
 
If you have any feedback, we would love to hear from you: communications@dacs.org.uk.
 
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Established by artists for artists, DACS is a not-for-profit visual artists' rights management organisation
 

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