Copy
Firescience.gov Friday Flash eNews

Issue 205 |  June 16, 2017 


Returning Fire to the Land—Celebrating Traditional Knowledge and Fire 
Firescience.gov logo
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Email
Email
Returning Fire to the Land—Celebrating Traditional Knowledge and Fire
Lead Authors
Frank K. Lake, Pacific Southwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service

Vita Wright, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service
Key Findings

Fire is a key ecological process influencing the distribution, structure, and function of many biomes world- wide. In North America, landscape fire effects are critical to many tribal cultures. Most tribes have traditional knowledge about how fire affects ecosystems, habitats, and resources. Many tribes used fire to improve the quantity, quality, and functionality of valued resources and habitats, but the extent of fire use varied across North America. Some tribes used fire extensively and purposively, as American Indian men and women carefully planned and conducted burns (prescribed) for different reasons, at different locations, in different seasons, and at different frequencies.  This report yields three important points:

  1. Wildland fire researchers and managers working with American Indian tribes can learn a great deal about fire-related resource values when working with traditional knowledge.
  2. Traditional burning practices can help achieve multiple resource objectives, especially for culturally important resources.
  3. Consultation, communication and coordination with tribes regarding wildland fire research and management can build trust and improve working relationships across jurisdictions. 

 
 

Publication
Workshop
Forward to Friend
Share
Tweet
+1
Share
Subscribe to this weekly eNews from Firescience.gov!
Copyright © 2017 Firescience.gov, All rights reserved.