Setting a course for a sustainable landscape

The South Atlantic LCC Newsletter delivers articles and announcements on landscape conservation efforts and events within the South Atlantic area. If you would like to contribute information about your landscape conservation work, please contact Lori Barrow.

   

 

 


LCC National Council Membership Announced

Reviewing the results from Blueprint workshops

For Tribal Communities, Managing and Adapting to Change is Nothing New

Your input on testing the South Atlantic Terrestrial Indicators

US Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell Discusses Sea Level Rise at Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge

Inventory & Monitoring Network: November 2013 newsletter available

Forest science benefits water resources, aids developing countries

Climate and SE US: Variability, Change, Impacts, and Vulnerability

Next Steps for the North Atlantic LCC 

Application of High Resolution Climate Models to Benefit Avian Conservation 





 
Upcoming events:
 

December 4th, 2013: Drought Impact Webinar Series: Colorado Water Conservation Board's Approach to Impacts Assessment

December 11th, 2013: Renewable Natural Resources Foundation's Congress on Coastal Resilience and Risk

December 11th, 2013: Overview of EPA's ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager

December 11th, 2013: The Role of Communication in Ensuring Sustained Behavior Change

December 12th, 2013: Triangle Climate and Landscape Researchers' Brown Bag

December 12th, 2013: Stay or Leave- the Urban Coast and Sea Level Rise

December 13th, 2013: Assessing Habitat and Community Sensitivity to Climate Change Impacts

December 18th, 2013: Using Effective Communication to Showcase Program Successes

December 19th, 2013: SALCC Third Thursday Web Forum

January 8th, 2013: Drought Impacts Webinar Series: Citizen Science Observation Networks

January 9th, 2013: Triangle Climate and Landscape Researchers' Brown Bag

January 14, 2013: TNC's Coastal Resilience 2.0

January 22nd, 2013: Valuing Ecosystem Services in the Face of Climate Change in NC & HI

January 22, 2013: SE Climate Science Center Grand Opening







 
News from the South Atlantic LCC
December 2013 Newsletter
 

LCC National Council Membership Announced
by Marshall Williams, Regional Environmental Coordinator,
US Army Regional Environmental and Energy Office

Within the South Atlantic LCC, two of our esteemed Cooperative members have been selected to serve on the LCC National Council: Ken McDermond and Mallory Martin. The Council will serve the LCC network by learning from them and helping to identify the ecological and institutional challenges faced by the LCCs that should be addressed at the national scale. Learn more about this council, and read what the South Atlantic LCC Steering Committee Chair had to say, >>by following this link...
Reviewing the Results from Blueprint Workshops 
by Rua Mordecai, Science Coordinator, South Atlantic LCC

Results from two of the breakout groups from the Raleigh Blueprint workshops are now ready for your to review. Over the next few weeks, we'll be releasing the results from the rest of the groups in Raleigh and all the groups from Savannah. Check out Rua's blog for access to the results...

For Tribal Communities, Managing and Adapting to Change is Nothing New
by Lori Barrow, USDA Forest Service Liaison, South Atlantic LCC

(Steve Terry and Seth Moore report back from a Tribal Cafe discussion during a Climate Change Adaptation Planning workshop held at the United South and Eastern Tribes annual meeting:  Photo submitted by USET)
For American Indian tribes and Alaskan natives, coping with a changing environment is nothing new. However, rapidly changing climatic conditions and extreme weather events in recent decades have disproportionately impacted tribes and altered landscapes they have known intimately for generations. Read more about how numerous Tribal leaders and land managers are choosing to meet this uncertain future head on by >>following Lori's post...

Your Input on Testing the South Atlantic Terrestrial Indicators
by Rua Mordecai, Science Coordinator, South Atlantic LCC

One of the key criteria in selecting the South Atlantic Natural Resource Indicators was their ability to represent a variety of organisms and ecological attributes within each South Atlantic ecosystem. Since there were only 3 indicators per ecosystem, there are probably a number of other things you think are important in the ecosystems of the South Atlantic that aren't being used directly as indicators. Please help our indicator testing team assess how the current indicators are doing by >>providing your input and suggestions...
Department of Interior Secretary Jewell Discusses Sea Level Rise at Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge
by Lori Barrow, USDA Forest Service Liaison, South Atlantic LCC

(Raye Nilius, Mike Oetker and 60 Stakeholders met with Interior Secretary Sally Jewell at the Sewee Visitor Center November 20th, 2013)
U.S. Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell visited Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge as part of a campaign to raise awareness about the importance of funding for scenic and important natural areas around the country. During the trip, she toured the refuge, talked with the public at a community meeting and met with local staff members of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Read more about Jewell's visit by >>following Lori's blog...
Inventory & Monitoring Network: November 2013 Newsletter Available 
by Laurel Barnhill, Inventory and Monitoring Coordinator, USFWS 

(Sorting freshwater mussels - Little River NWR | Image Credit: Janet Ertel/USFWS)
The Southeast National Wildlife Refuge System Inventory and Monitoring network is pleased to share the November 2013 update! This issue highlights FY13 accomplishments, introduces a new I&M ecologist, provides project updates, and presents data management applications. Find it, by following Laurel's post... 
Forest Science Benefits Water Resources, Aids Developing Countries
by Lori Barrow, USDA Forest Service Liaison, South Atlantic LCC

U.S. Forest Service researchers are expanding a web-based planning tool designed to project future water availability in the United States, Mexico, and Africa. The Water Supply Stress Index (WaSSI) model can predict how climate, land cover, and human population change may impact water availability and carbon sequestration at the watershed level and across the lower 48 United States, Mexico, Rwanda, and Burundi. Learn more about the enhanced online WaSSI tool by >>following this link...
New Report Released- Climate of the SE US: Variability, Change, Impacts, & Vulnerability
by Lori Barrow, USDA Forest Service Liaison, South Atlantic LCC

As part of the 2013 National Climate Assessment, a new report has been released that summarizes and examines the latest impacts, scenarios, and vulnerabilities to future climate within the Southeastern US. Covering eleven southern states, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands, it includes information on the climate of the region as well as climate change impacts to specific sectors including public health, energy, the built environment, agriculture, and water resources. Rich in science and case studies, electronic copies of the report can be accessed by following Lori's blog... 

Next Steps for the North Atlantic LCC 
by Rua Mordecai, Science Coordinator, South Atlantic LCC

(NALCC Steering Committee members John O'Leary and Sharri Venno discuss an issue during a break in the meeting)

Wondering what the North Atlantic LCC will be focusing on in 2014? Find a nice summary of what came out of the recent steering committee meeting by checking >>out Rua's blog.. 
Upcoming Webinar: Application of High Resolution Climate Models to Benefit Avian Conservation 
by Elda Varela-Acevedo, Research Associate, USGS 

The Prairie Pothole Region of the northern Great Plains contains millions of small prairie wetlands that provide critical habitat to migrating and breeding birds. To examine the potential effects of climate change on birds within this reagion, researchers from the USGS and Colorado State University modeled contemporary and projected distributions of common wetland-dependent bird species using breeding bird survey occurrence records and wetland distribution, land use, and climate parameters. Join them on Tuesday, December 10th for a special webinar examining their methods, results, and ongoing work examining current and future adequacy for wetland-dependent birds within the U.S. To find out more, or register, >>click here.
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Warmer winter temperatures and reductions in the intensity of freeze events, due to climate change, would likely lead to the expansion of mangrove forests and the displacement of salt marshes in parts of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast. Researchers have joined forces throughout the SE to to better evaluate the ecological implications of mangrove forest migration and salt marsh displacement.