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The official newsletter of Enough is Enough Professional Organizing
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Spring Has Sprung!
 
Welcome to spring 2016 newsletter of Enough is Enough Organizing. As always, you’ll find quick and easy suggestions to help you become—and stay—more efficient, productive and organized.
 
If you read something helpful that you don’t want to keep to yourself, please go ahead and share it on social media and with friends.
 
Is there a topic you’d like to read more about or an organizing question you have? I’d love to write about it. Email me at junebell (at) me.com.
 
 
My Storage Unit, My Kingdom
 
Does that headline sound a bit over the top? For a handful of folks with plenty of means, it’s the truth. The Wall Street Journal reported a few weeks ago that builders of high-end storage units are catering to a rarefied clientele, people who have no qualms about dropping six figures for storage spaces with jaw-dropping amenities.
 
After all, they need a clean, secure and temperature-controlled place to store vintage and collectible cars, arcade games and basketball courts. Some sites even include laundry rooms, bathrooms, terraces, decks and other areas for socializing.
 
You might be wondering why these ultra-wealthy people need to spread beyond the expansive footprints of their mansions, multi-car garages and vast acreage. The article offers some insights from James Murray of the Vaults, which offers two-level storage spaces for starting at $245,000.
 
He explains that prosperous homeowners are “making their lives simpler” by opting to live in smaller homes in more pedestrian-friendly areas. So they “don’t have the space to store those vehicles or the luxury RV.”
 
Take a minute to consider the irony of how “making their lives simpler” might mesh with owning so many cars that you can’t fit them in your home’s garage.
 
Art for Art’s Sake
 
If you’re a diehard minimalist, a bare wall may be inviting and pleasing. But most people like to enliven their vertical spaces with some pictures, paintings or prints.
 
Does what’s on your walls reflect what you enjoy and make you feel at ease? Artwork isn’t doing its job if you don’t like it. That applies to pictures you inherited from relatives, gifts you received from friends and family, and pieces you bought a long time ago but no longer suit your taste or decor. Artwork that doesn’t make you happy simply doesn’t belong on your walls.
 
Neither do faded pieces. Prints can become washed out over time, losing their vividness and contrast if they’ve spent years hanging on a wall that is subject to harsh direct light.
 
For fresh art that doesn’t cost a fortune, try art.com’s broad selection. If you don’t know what you like or want to get a better understanding of your style, try the free “art explorer” tool on zatista.com. Click on the pictures you like and zatista’s tool will analyze your taste and suggest original artworks from its site that fit your preferences.
 
Perhaps you love all your art but just have too much to display at once. Take your cue from galleries and museums: Rotate your collection seasonally to showcase various pieces throughout the year.
 
image credit: wall street journal/a subsidiary of dow jones, inc
If You Have Only 15 Minutes …
 
Fortify yourself with your favorite beverage and face off against the most dreaded of foes: “The Pile.”
 
Even those who have supposedly “gone paperless” aren’t immune to a haphazard stack of magazine subscription renewal notices, college class dues statements, invitations, pizza coupons, takeout menus, business cards, scribbled notes and maybe even a recipe that looks easy, quick and delicious.
 
First: Do a quick sort, tossing time-sensitive offers that have expired, solicitations you don’t want to answer and anything that’s no longer relevant.
 
Then: Divide the remaining papers into themed categories such as “takeout menus,” “recipes,” “taxes” and “ask spouse.” Create one called “take action” for those that must trigger a call or appointment (such as a reminder card from the dentist that your kids need a checkup).
 
Next: Add the “take action” tasks to you daily or weekly to-do list. If you want to make that recipe, put the ingredients you need on your shopping list and pick a night you’ll make that dish.
 
Finally: Automate what you can. Turn off paper bank statements and have your college class dues auto-charged to your credit card each year.
 
Lastly, let go of guilt: Life moves fast, and papers pile up. If you’re not missing your car payments or your best friend’s wedding, don’t sweat it.
Copyright © 2016 ¡Enough is Enough! Professional Organizing, All rights reserved.


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