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Chinese Medicine Living Newsletter

Happy March!

It seems like it has been a long winter for many of us, but it is nearing its conclusion - Spring is coming! But, until then, you can read about how to boost your immune system with acupressure, and read about the wonders of ginger so you can avoid catching a cold or flu for the rest of the winter months, and make it, as a healthy human, into Spring. :)

Also, check out our article on Acupuncture.com this month - Anatomy of an Acupuncture Needle. Awesome!

Please support Chinese Medicine Living by visiting the store and purchasing products that help us continue to share the love of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. <3

Here Are This Months Articles...

5 Acupressure Points to Boost Your Immune System

Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP

Acupuncture and everything that falls under the umbrella of Chinese medicine – including herbsfood therapy, cupping and moxibustion – was designed as a medicine of prevention. Instead of waiting until they got sick, the ancient Chinese (and I suspect many modern Chinese) took steps to boost their immune systems so they were better equipped to fight off disease and stay healthy. There are many very powerful acupuncture points that serve to boost the immune system and help it to fight disease, and by using some gentle stimulation, you can build your body’s immunity right in the comfort of your own home, at work, in the car or wherever – that is what makes acupressure so awesome, you can literally do it anywhere. :)

Acupressure is simply applying pressure to the acupuncture points instead of using needles. Acupressure is an excellent way to stimulate these points whenever you feel like your immune system could use a boost. Below are a list of 5 powerhouse points to boost your immune system and help you fight off any bacteria and viruses that might be floating around.

Most acupuncture points run bilaterally – meaning on both sides of the body, except for the meridians that run along the midline. So, each of these points have a right and a left. One side is often more tender than the other, but it is a good idea to stimulate both to get a balanced effect. Below are 5 acupressure points to boost your immune system.

Read full article...

Winter - The Water Element

Acupuncture Plays Nice with Others.

By Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP

Acupuncture is very friendly and does not compete. There are no unpleasant side effects, and it uses the body’s own energies to rebalance and heal. It really is the perfect system. Needles are inexpensive and portable, making it widely accessible both socioeconomically, and geographically. There are many stories of tiny acupuncture clinics springing up in remote parts of the world, helping hundreds of people who might not otherwise have access to medical care. These are only some of the reasons why I am so in love with it.

Setting up Western medical clinics in remote and impoverished parts of the planet is considerably more difficult. Equipment and supplies, as well as expensive drugs are needed which often makes running them cost prohibitive.

Acupuncture is a complete, superhero system on its own, able to treat limitless ailments – but also combines with every other modality, from massage to oncology to mental health, to compliment and improve their effects. I have worked in many multidisciplinary clinics over the years, sharing patients with other doctors. Sometimes the acupuncture was used to reinforce the treatment a patient was being given and sometimes, it was used to combat the negative side effects of treatments and medications. Every time, it was inserted seamlessly into a patients treatment to make it better. Acupuncture plays nice with others.

Read full article...

Ask an Acupuncturist.

Ginger is Medicine.

By Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP

There is nothing sassier than biting down on a piece of ginger in your stir fry or noodle bowl. You immediately understand the power of this tasty root as it floods your mouth with a burning sensation that brings tears to your eyes. But, do not underestimate this tiny rhizome, it is not just burn – it is chalked full of medicinal effects and a well documented history of healing the body of innumerable ailments. Ginger is medicine.

GINGER HEALING PROPERTIES

  • Treats and prevents multiple forms of cancer
  • Prevents diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol
  • Is a natural antibiotic
  • Is excellent for treating digestive problems, nausea, stomachache and vomiting
  • Prevents intestinal ulcers
  • Fights fungal infections and toxicity
  • Is used as a stimulant in cases of bad circulation
  • In feverish conditions is used as a diaphoretic (promotes sweating)
  • Important for heart health
  • Fights gout and arthritis
  • Is an effective gargle for sore throats
  • Is a remedy for motion sickness
  • Reduces pain and inflammation
  • Boosts the immune system to fight off colds and flu
  • Is a natural painkiller
  • Treats migraines
  • Relieves menstrual cramps
  • Prevents diabetic neuropathy
  • Promote energy circulation and increase metabolic rate
  • Is rich in vitamin C
  • Eaten in the summer to increase sweating and cool the body (raw not dried)

Read full article...

Quote

Quote of the Month

As rain falls equally on the just and the unjust, do not burden your heart with judgments but rain your kindness equally on all.

~ Buddha

Inspiration

Inspiration

Teaching Students How to Combat Traumas of Poverty with Yoga and Mindfulness

At Cesar Chavez Academy in East Palo Alto, Calif., 7th graders are learning yoga as a way to cope with the stress of life in a community rife with homelessness, shootings and gang war trauma. By teaching these children to pay close attention to their breathing and movements, Stanford University researchers are hoping they will focus better in school and beyond. 


Watch the Video Here

Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine in the News

Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine in the News

20 Years of Chinese Medicine in Malta

Herbs Help Dolphin Overcome Ulcerative Stomatitis Lesions

Baptist University Steps Up Fight for Chinese Medicine Hospital Site

A Chinese Herb for Better Heart Health

Well Educated Dutch Women Most Likely to Use Alternative Medicine - Acupuncture, #1 Choice

Bark of Cork Tree May Fight Pancreatic Cancer

Korean Medicine Looks Toward Russia

Acupuncture for Heart Failure Recovery - New Research

Abundant expression and functional participation of TRPV1 at Zunsanli acupoint (ST36) in mice: mechanosensitive TRPV1 as an "acupuncture-responding channel"

Deep Muscle Pain? Give Gua Sha a Try.

Acupuncture Effective for Cerebral Vasospasm - New Study

Vet Gives Owl Acupuncture to Heal Injured Leg

What is Cupping? Lena Dunham Latest Celebrity to Try the Ancient Chinese Remedy for Pain Relief

Recipe of the Month with NourishU

Recipe Of The Month with NourishU

Stir Fried Chives with Egg

Chive is a grass like perennial vegetable with long green leave tubules, is very inexpensive and can be found in most grocery stores. It is in the same allium family as garlic, onions, scallions and leeks. Chive is very popular in Chinese cuisine because of its many health benefits. Many households grow chives in their backyard or in containers because it is easy to grow and can be handy in times of need. Besides, after each harvest cutting, all the leaves will grow back very quickly giving continuous yield from early spring to late autumn and year after year without much work. To maximize chives’ healthful effects, homegrown organic chives and freshly cut momentarily before cooking is the best way to receive the maximum benefit.

Chinese medicine defines chives as warm in nature and pungent in taste. It is a yang food which acts on the liver, stomach and kidney, warms the middle region and promotes energy circulation. Chive is commonly known as a ‘rising yang vegetable’ because it is used to treat men with impotence. Chive is also known to be effective in dispersing blood coagulation, treating diarrhea and intestinal infections, treating difficulty in swallowing and improving appetite, relieving stomach aches of cold nature and stopping nosebleeds. The best season to eat chive is spring because the new growth has the most nutrients to offer and they work more effectively with the spleen system.

INGREDIENTS (2 to 3 servings)

  • Chinese chives – one bunch (about 300gm)
  • Eggs – 3
  • Minced ginger – one spoonful
  • Cooking wine – 2 table spoonfuls

DIRECTIONS

  1. Rinse chives a few times, strain and cut into bite size sections.

  2. Beat eggs and mix in seasoning to taste (salt, pepper, one spoonful of cooking oil).

  3. Warm 2 spoonfuls of oil in a non-stick pan. Add minced ginger and stir for half a minute. Add chives and stir for another minute until just cooked. Add cooking wine and a small pitch of salt. Mix and put chives onto a plate.

  4. Warm another spoonful of oil in the pan. Pour in egg mixture and scramble to egg until its about 80% cooked. Return chive to pan to mix with egg, then put everything onto a plate and serve.

USAGE

Can be eaten with no restrictions.

Read full article on Chive Healing Properties...

Chinese Medicine Living

About Chinese Medicine Living

Chinese Medicine Living is a place where Chinese medicine principles are applied to the way we live our lives to improve health on every level. In our articles, interviews and information we strive to teach how the body and the world is seen through the eyes of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) so you can better understand its theories, and how to live a healthy balanced lifestyle according to its principles. How TCM views the body and its connections to emotions, living in harmony with the world around us, and how to achieve the balance synonymous with health are the ways in which we strive to impart the limitless wisdom of Chinese medicine. Welcome.

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