Copy

 

 

Chinese Medicine Living Logo
Chinese Medicine Living Newsletter

Happy 2014!!

2014 is supposed to be a very auspicious year. For the first time in 19 years, the new year begins on a new moon. Themes for this year include clearing out the old, letting go, and making room for the new. For those of you who struggled in 2013, 2014 is supposed to bring all the things you have been working for into fruition. We wish everyone a happy, healthy new year - may you all find everything you desire this year!

We would like to announce a new page on the Chinese Medicine Living Blog that will list links to current research into the efficacy of acupuncture, Chinese herbs and Chinese medicine. It is called "Research" and can be found under "Medicine". It will be updated continuously, so keep checking in for all the latest. :)

Check out our article on Acupuncture.com this month - The Common Cold - Causes and Food Therapy in Chinese Medicine. Yay!

Please support Chinese Medicine Living by visiting the store and purchasing products that help us continue to share the love of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. <3

Here Are This Months Articles...

Ultimate Health - It's All About Balance

By Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP

2014 is supposed to be an auspicious year. For the first time in 19 years, the new year started on a new moon, or super moon, which is defined as a new or full moon that occurs with the moon at or near within 90% of its closest approach to earth. The themes for this year are major detox and cleansing and letting go which prepares us for rebirth and new beginnings.

The new year is also a time when people make resolutions, and many are focussed on health. We all want to be a little healthier, exercise a little more, eat better and have more time for ourselves. One of the things that I love about Chinese medicine is its emphasis on lifestyle. It is not simply going to the acupuncturist when you are having a hard time sleeping or taking herbs for trouble with digestion, in its purest form it teaches how to live so that we can achieve balance in every aspect of our lives, which is the goal to ultimate health.

Living your life with complete equanimity is no small task. It seems logical and is a wonderful goal, but anyone who has tried knows that balance, which seems so simple, is unbelievably difficult in the modern world. Below are some ways in which you can work towards balance in your life for every aspect of yourself, body, mind and spirit.

Read full article...

Winter - The Water Element

Winter - The Water Element

By Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP

Much of Chinese Medicine is based on the theory of the five elements, or Wu Xing. Each element has many associations, including a season, both a yin and a yang organ, colour, direction, taste and emotions. Below is a list of the seasons, their elements, organs and the emotions associated with them.

Summer – Fire  - Heart – Joy
Late Summer (or the end of any season) – Earth – Spleen – Worry or Over Thinking
Autumn / Fall – Metal – Lungs – Sadness
Winter – Water – Kidneys – Fear
Spring – Wood – Liver – Anger

The winter season is associated with water and the kidneys. The kidneys are the foundation of our yin and yang energies, store our Jing (or essence) and govern vital activities like birth, growth, reproduction and development. The kidneys are said to open into the ears, thus our ability to hear clearly is dependent on strong kidney energy. The kidneys also govern bones, teeth, hair on the head, the nervous system and brain.

Read full article...

Ask an Acupuncturist.

History and Development of Internal Martial Arts in China

VIDEO - 25 MINS

Watch the Internal Martial Arts Video...

Quote

Quote of the Month

It's not the years in your life that count, its the life in your years.

~ Abraham Lincoln

Inspiration

Inspiration

Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes us Warm All Over

By MICHAELEEN DOUCLEFF

Close your eyes and imagine the last time you fell in love. Maybe you were walking next to your sweetheart in a park or staring into each other's eyes over a latte.

Where did you feel the love? Perhaps you got butterflies in your stomach or your heart raced with excitement.

When a team of scientists in Finland asked people to map out where they felt different emotions on their bodies, they found that the results were surprisingly consistent, even across cultures.

People reported that happiness and love sparked activity across nearly the entire body, while depression had the opposite effect: It dampened feelings in the arms, legs and head. Danger and fear triggered strong sensations in the chest area, the volunteers said. And anger was one of the few emotions that activated the arms.


Read Full Article on the NPR Blog

Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine in the News

Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine in the News

5 Bruce Lee Principles That Will Help You Pursue Your Dreams

Trials of TCM

Hope With Patients With PTSD

What Yoga, Massage Therapy & Acupuncture Can Do For You

Ear Acupressure Eases PONV After Knee Surgery

Traditional Chinese Medicine Plant Found To Relieve Chronic Pain

Gold Acupuncture Needle MRI Pain Discovery

Weight-Loss LifestyleTips from East & West

New CT Scans Reveal Acupuncture Points

Traditional Chinese Medicine Plant a Potent Painkiller - Study Finds

Acupuncture Beneficial for Breast Cancer Patients

People Turning to Acupuncture for Help

Pregnant Gwen Stefani Gets Acupuncture in LA

Cirrhosis Sufferers Should Try Non Drug Strategies for Pain

Recipe of the Month with NourishU

Recipe Of The Month with NourishU

Rejuvenating 4 Super Herbs Chicken Soup - Winter Recipe

In Chinese Medicine, eating according to the seasons is vital to health and longevity. Eating well in winter is necessary to provide enough reserve and energy to our bodies to fight the extreme coldness. Besides, winter is also the time when our bodies are going through a lot of rejuvenation and renewal processes. Therefore, it is important to feed our bodies with sufficient nutrients as fuel and building blocks in order for them to do a good job keeping us healthy. Remember, it is quality that counts and not quantity, and you reap what you sow.

The traditional TCM nourishing foods which use a combination of high quality foods and herbs makes a significant difference in terms of effectiveness and potency. There are recipes which are very specific in targeting special health needs and can deliver desirable functional health benefits. By combining the synergetic effects of both foods and herbs, there is nothing else that is as effective. That is why there is little wonder why some Chinese people can live long and healthy lives, and look so much younger than their age.

The most popular and effective form of TCM nourishing food is soup. Soup in winter is especially warming and welcome by most people. Besides, soup can be nutrient dense, easy to make, easy to take, easy to digest and absorb, and suitable for all ages. You can make a large batch at a time and serve for more than one meal; therefore soup is very economical and practical. The ingredients for soup can vary according to availability and your liking; therefore it is easy to make and is always delicious as you can customize it to your liking. Recipes are just there to provide general guidelines and its not necessary to follow them precisely.

My personal favourite winter soup is cooking either chicken or pork or mutton with the following four superior herbs. It is the soup that my family enjoys about twice a month throughout the winter and keeps everyone healthy. You don’t have to use all of the four herbs together if they are too much for you. It is very common to use just goji-berries and Chinese yam to make other soups for regular consumption. Please visit our website www.nourishu.com to find other recipes using just the two herbs. Please also note that these herbal soups should not be taken when you have a cold or flu because they will nourish the viruses making them stronger and more difficult to get rid of.

Dang Shen (Codonopsis root)

Is sweet in taste and neutral in nature. It improves digestive health, improves blood deficiency, promotes energy, enhances qi, improves overall body functions and improves immune function.

Astragalus (Huang Qi)

Is sweet and slightly sour in taste and warm in nature. It improves immune function, circulation, digestion and overall health. It is used to fight diseases including cancer and to prevent aging. There are researches which have confirmed that astragalus can boost telomerase production.

Goji-berry (Chinese Wolfberry)

Is sweet in taste and neutral in nature. It benefits liver and kidney health, improves deficiencies, promotes blood and regulates blood sugar, improves vision and overall health.

Chinese Yam (Shan Yao)

Is sweet in taste and neutral in nature. It improves digestive health, lung functions and immune function, and strengthens kidney health and cure related deficiencies.

THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS

Improves blood and qi, promotes energy and circulation, is anti-aging, improves immune functions and benefits our vital organs and improves overall health.

INGREDIENTS

  • Dang-shen  黨參 - 10gm

  • Astragalus (huang qi) 黃耆 - 10gm

  • Goji-berry / Chinese Wolfberry (gou ji zi) 枸杞子 - 30gm

  • Chinese Yam (shan yao) 淮山 - 30gm

  • Skinless chicken breast – one piece (bone in)

  • Ginger - 3 slices

  • Citrus Peel (chen-pi) 陳皮- one piece (pre-soaked and with white membrane removed)

  • Red dates – 5 to 6

Optional ingredients to add more taste and health benefits:

  • Lean pork or pork shoulder blade with bone - 120gm (cut into a few pieces)

  • Dried scallop - 4 to 5 (to promote yin)

DIRECTIONS

  1. Soak herbs for 5 to 10 minutes and rinse a few times.
  2. Wash chicken breast and pork, remove obvious fat and put them in boiling water to cook for a few minutes with foam bubbling to the top, remove and rinse.
  3. Put all ingredients in a soup pot with about 3 liters of clean filtered water. Bring soup to boil for about 5 minutes, remove foam and reduce heat to simmer for 3 hours. Add extra hot water to the cooking if necessary. You should get at least 6 cups of nutrient dense broth.
  4. When ready, add sea salt (Celtic or Himalaya) to taste and serve. Eat some meat with soup. Goji-berries and Chinese yam can be eaten as well. If you are not intending to eat all of the meat, after finishing the broth, you can break up the meat and add another 4 to 5 cups of water to cook for the second time, for about another 20 minutes over medium high heat. You can get at least two more cups of really yummy broth from it before discarding the ingredients.

USAGE

Not suitable when suffering with a cold or flu.

Read full article on Rejuvenating 4 Super Herbs Chicken Soup...

Chinese Medicine Living

About Chinese Medicine Living

Chinese Medicine Living is a place where Chinese medicine principles are applied to the way we live our lives to improve health on every level. In our articles, interviews and information we strive to teach how the body and the world is seen through the eyes of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) so you can better understand its theories, and how to live a healthy balanced lifestyle according to its principles. How TCM views the body and its connections to emotions, living in harmony with the world around us, and how to achieve the balance synonymous with health are the ways in which we strive to impart the limitless wisdom of Chinese medicine. Welcome.

If you would like to contact us, please email info@chinesemedicineliving.com. We would love to hear from you.

To learn more, please visit our blog and the store to learn more about this wonderful medicine. <3

Chinese Medicine Living is nice!