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Chinese Medicine Living Newsletter 04

Welcome to June!

The Chinese Medicine Living Blog has a new look! I really love the new design and the articles are much easier to read, I hope you like it too. :) We have had some people send us photos of themselves in their I love acupuncture shirts! I invite all you beautiful people to send along any photos of you rocking your Chinese Medicine Living gear - shirts / mugs / buttons. We will post them on the blog and are putting together a gallery to showcase them!! <3

Please like our facebook page because we like you too. :)

Acupuncture.com has published the article - Why Acupuncture Works for Seniors this month on their site. Yay!

Here Are This Months Articles...

Escape Fire Review

Escape Fire - The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare -
Movie Review

By Emma Suttie, D.Ac

Escape Fire is a documentary film that presents a sobering exploration of the US medical system, and how it is largely failing the American people. In a country that spends more on healthcare than any other country in the world ($2.7 trillion annually), it seems that there should be a direct correlation with the amount of money spent and the overall health of the population. Instead of being at the top of the list in life expectancy, the United States is number 50. The film states that in the US, 75% of healthcare costs go to treating chronic diseases that are largely preventable. It is also estimated that 30% of healthcare spending (roughly $750 billion annually) is wasted and does not improve health.

The film presents some of the reasons that the present system is not working and why, despite the enormous amount of money spent, Americans are so unhealthy. The first and most fundamental is that it is a system not based on health, but on disease. Disease is the focus of both medical education and practice and therefore, doctors are not taught basic things like nutrition and prevention and instead specialize into fields where the focus is on disease. This focus on disease means that the entire system does not even enter into the equation until the disease has already manifested, and is thus based on intervention after the problems have already developed.

Read full article...

How to be a Gardener

How To Be A Gardener - Learning How To Grow For Yourself

One way in which we can all live in accordance with Chinese medicine principles is to be connected to the earth. One wonderful way to do this is by gardening. When you garden you are literally digging in the dirt, and connecting to the planet. It is, for many, an incredibly healing and grounding activity.

It is not easy for some of us to garden as we may live in cold climates, or in apartments with limited or no outside space, but even having plants, life, in your home is a wonderful way to connect to nature and add life to your environment.

There is a wonderful series of shows by the BBC called - How to be a Gardener. There are eight episodes in the series and they offer practical, simple insights on the basics of gardening, and no one is more serious (or sassier) about gadrening than the Brits! So, even if you don't have a huge yard, these tips can help you to understand the basics of growing and perhaps inspire you to get out there and create something beautiful of your own.

How To Be A Gardener - Episode One- Know Your Plot

Watch the video...

Ask an Acupuncturist.

Ask An Acupuncturist.

Question
I have been going to an acupuncturist (who is Chinese and speaks very little English) for my terrible headaches, and I am just wondering, why he is putting needles in my legs, stomach and hands and not in my head?

Answer

Ha. Good question. This is particularly confusing to those of us who grew up in the West with the Cartesian model of medicine where we tend to treat the part that is giving us problems directly (if we are suffering with headaches, we look for problems in the head, etc..). The Chinese medical model however, has a different approach. Because it is based on a holistic system, it is the entire body that is assessed to discover where the imbalance is that is creating the headache, instead of treating the head directly. In TCM there are many, many reasons that one may suffer from a headache, and each person's headache must be flushed out and the root of the problem discovered so that it can be treated. Often, the cause of headaches can be an excess of yang or fire energy in the body which flares upwards causing things like headaches, red eyes, anger, and bitter taste in the mouth. To treat this, the yin, or water energy of the body must be supplemented which is often done with points in the lower legs, we would also often treat the lower part of the body in an attempt to draw the heat down and anchor it which would alleviate the symptoms.

So, although in Chinese medicine there are many causes for headaches, the acupuncturist is always looking for the root cause so that it can be corrected, so that often means treating points in other parts of the body and not the head directly.

Read full article...

Quote

Hippocrates Says

It is far more important to know what person the disease has than what disease the person has.

Inspiration

Inspiration

Recommended Reading
Be Here Now By Ram Dass
Then you turn to the first page of the book, and you are suddenly sucked into the story of a Harvard psychiatrist who has reached the pinnacle of success, discovers the mind-expanding powers of acid, and ends up trooping through India with a 23-year-old holy man from Laguna Beach, California. In the story, you see all the trappings of your own life and begin to wonder if India might hold the answers after all. Before booking your ticket, turn to the last section of the Be Here Now, "Cookbook for a Sacred Life." Ram Dass saves you the trouble by proffering a sober introduction to the basics of Hindu religion. Although he still can't resist CAPITAL LETTERS, he has done his homework, presenting a whole range of concepts and practices having to do with yoga postures, meditation, renunciation, dying, and sexual energy. So, for the most part, Be Here Now stands the test of time, and if you can entertain the center section in a retro kind of a spirit, it might be just what you're looking for: "The opposite of craving is saying, baby, this is the way it is, yeah, OK, here and now, this is it. I ACCEPT THE HERE & NOW FULLY." --Brian Bruya

Inspirational Video of the Month :)

Plantastic! Ron Finley: A Geurilla Gardener in South Central LA
Artist and designer Ron Finley couldn’t help but notice what was going on in his backyard. “South Central Los Angeles,” he quips, “home of the drive-thru and the drive-by.” And it's the drive-thru fast-food stands that contribute more to the area’s poor health and high mortality rate, with one in two kids contracting a curable disease like Type 2 diabetes.

Finley’s vision for a healthy, accessible “food forest” started with the curbside veggie garden he planted in the strip of dirt in front of his own house. When the city tried to shut it down, Finley’s fight gave voice to a larger movement that provides nourishment, empowerment, education -- and healthy, hopeful futures -- one urban garden at a time.

Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine in the News

Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture in the News

Acupuncture Helping People with Concussions

Acupuncture Eases Intestinal Disorders - New Study

Acupuncture Helps Heal Hurting Turtles

Acupuncture Helps Smokers Quit

Acupuncture Really Works for Lower Back Pain

A German Fan of Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture for Painful Injuries

Acupuncture Treats Headaches - New Study

5 Reasons You Should Try Acupuncture

The List - Taking the Mystery Our of Acupuncture

Soothe Summer Skin with Acupuncture

People with Chronic Neck Pain Benefit from Acupuncture

Docs that Serve Pro Sorts Teams Add Acupuncture

Acupuncture Business Cards

Taming Spring Fever with Three Recipes to Heal Your Allergies

Recipe of the Month with NourishU

Dandelion - A Gift From Mother Nature

Dandelion is a very common perennial herb that grows wild in fields all over the world. It has tooth-edged leaves and yellow flowers. People in Europe and Asia commonly use dandelion as food and medicine. In foods, dandelion is used as salad greens, in soups, wine, and teas. The roasted root is used as a coffee substitute. In medicine, the whole plant is used to make herbal concoction or herbal extract.

Clinical studies have shown dandelion has protective effects against lipid peroxidation and free radicals, both damaging products of a poorly functioning liver. Like burdock, dandelion contains a wealth of nutrients important to liver function, especially the B vitamins. It cleanses the liver and increases the production of bile. Therefore, it is often used as a herbal treatment for all liver diseases including hepatitis, cirrhosis and jaundice.

Chinese Medicine defines dandelion as cold in nature and bitter and sweet in taste. It is attributive to liver and stomach. The therapeutic effects include clearing away heat and detoxifying blood. It is used as weight-loss aid because of its diuretic effects. Dandelion reduces swelling and dissolves clots and is used for treating food poisoning, inflammation of liver and gallbladder, kidney and gallbladder stones, tuberculosis and clots in lungs.

Read more...

Cancer Prevention Dandelion Tea

THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS
Prevents cancer by clearing internal energy blockages and blood stagnation so that the cells can breathe and function properly.

INGREDIENTS

  • Dandelion 蒲公英 - 7 gm

  • Radix angelicae pubescentis (du huo) 獨活 – 5 gm   

DIRECTIONS

  1.   Put the two herbs with 2 cups of water in a pot.
  2.   Bring water to a boil and let it cook for 2 to 3 minutes.
  3.   Strain and drink tea only.

Read full article on dandelion and its amazing health benefits...

Chinese Medicine Living

About Chinese Medicine Living

Chinese Medicine Living is a place where Chinese medicine principles are applied to the way we live our lives to improve health on every level. In our articles, interviews and information we strive to teach how the body and the world is seen through the eyes of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) so you can better understand its theories, and how to live a healthy balanced lifestyle according to its principles. How TCM views the body and its connections to emotions, living in harmony with the world around us, and how to achieve the balance synonymous with health are the ways in which we strive to impart the limitless wisdom of Chinese medicine. Welcome.

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