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Really, Whoopi?

Readers who remember when everyone smoked cigarettes may remember candy cigarettes. They looked like the real thing and allowed kids to look "grown up" like our parents. We observed how they smoked and mimicked them, so when we began smoking, we could be "cool." 
 
Other siren calls to kids and teens included "Spuds McKenzie," Budweiser's Party Animal, and Joe Camel (remember him?), whose campaign to lure people into smoking, studies showed, turned out to be more effective with kids than adults. 

Now comes Whoopi Goldberg, bent on capturing a "niche market" -- women's menstrual pain. Any evidence medical cannabis relieves menstrual pain? Not a shred. Any evidence "half the population" suffers menstrual cramps, as Whoopi's PR machine claims? Nope.

Instead, the National Library of Medicine says moderate to severe menstrual pain "is more common in women under age 20."  That's right. Whoopi's niche market is your underage daughters.

Come on, Whoopi, leave the kids alone.

Read USA Today story here. Read National Library of Medicine article here. Read Whoopi puff piece here. (Ask your daughter's doctor if there is any truth whatsoever to the claims made on this website.) 
 
Apparently, If You are "High-End,"
Marijuana Will Not Hurt You

More and more women are getting into the "cannabis space," producing and selling so-called exquisite marijuana products. These "types of wellness products send out a positive message that cannabis has a medical purpose, a well-being purpose," says Lisa Sweeney, Los Angeles chapter chair of Women Grow.

"This is a really simple re-branding campaign," says Cheryl Shuman, director of the Beverly Hills Cannabis Club and Moms for Marijuana. "When people think of cannabis, they think of a bunch of weed in a Ziploc bag. Our packaging, with 14-karat gold leaves, porcelain and crystal, is very high-end, something you'd expect at Tiffany's, [that] shows the high society, if you will, of cannabis." 

Read LA Weekly story here. Learn more about Women Grow here.
 
How One Pediatric Hospital Group
Is Handling Low THC Cannabis Oil

Legislators struggling with CBD legislation may want to ask why epilepsy specialists refuse to recommend "Low THC cannabis oil" that some states have legalized to tiny patients--and why hospitals will not dispense them to these children.

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA), a large hospital group in Georgia "Dedicated to All Better," makes clear what the rules are for the safety of its pediatric patients. Even though the state legalized cannabis oil containing CBD and up to 5% THC for childhood epilepsy and seven other diseases last year, the physician's code is, "First, Do No Harm." 

CHOA "supports clinical research to investigate the use of medical cannabis, but there is currently limited information about how low THC oil use affects patients," the hospital states and then lays out its policy for dealing with a substance that has not been approved by FDA as safe or effective.

It is to be hoped that FDA will soon approve pharmaceutical-grade CBD that is guaranteed to be free of contaminants and also guaranteed to effectively reduce or eliminate seizures. 

Does that mean, once a pharmaceutical CBD version hits the market, all CBD products that states are legalizing will get the green light? Absolutely not, unless their growers are willing to subject their products to FDA protocols. If a pharmaceutical version appears soon, doctors will be able to prescribe the product and insurance companies are likely to cover it. At that point, states--including Georgia--should repeal their CBD laws and stop exposing desperately ill children--and their understandably desperate parents--to untested, unsafe, ineffective drugs.

Read CHOA Low THC Cannabis Oil policy here.
The Marijuana Report is a weekly e-newsletter produced by National Families in Action in partnership with SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana). Subscribe to The Marijuana Report and visit our website, The Marijuana Report.Org, to learn more about the marijuana story unfolding across the nation.

About National Families in Action (NFIA)
NFIA consists of families, scientists, business leaders, physicians, addiction specialists, policymakers, and others committed to protecting children from addictive drugs. Our vision is:
  • Healthy, drug-free kids
  • Nurturing, addiction-free families
  • Scientifically accurate information and education
  • A nation free of Big Marijuana
  • Smart, safe, FDA-approved medicines developed from the cannabis plant (and other plants) 
  • Expanded access to medicines in FDA clinical trials for children with epilepsy

About SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana) 

SAM is a nonpartisan alliance of lawmakers, scientists and other concerned citizens who want to move beyond simplistic discussions of "incarceration versus legalization" when discussing marijuana use and instead focus on practical changes in marijuana policy that neither demonizes users nor legalizes the drug. SAM supports a treatment, health-first marijuana policy. 

SAM has four main goals: 
  • To inform public policy with the science of today's marijuana.
  • To reduce the unintended consequences of current marijuana policies, such as lifelong stigma due to arrest.
  • To prevent the establishment of "Big Marijuana" - and a 21st-Century tobacco industry that would market marijuana to children.
  • To promote research of marijuana's medical properties and produce, non-smoked, non-psychoactive pharmacy-attainable medications.
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