Copy
View this email in your browser
Specialists Warn Against Giving Marijuana
to Children with Autism, Other Disorders
 
Treating children and adolescents with marijuana for autism, ADHD, and other developmental and behavioral disorders is not recommended, say specialists in the field.
 
Doctors from the Divisions of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine and Developmental Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School warn the current trend of states legalizing marijuana for these conditions may actually be hurting rather than helping children.
 
The experts say there simply is not enough evidence to justify such a practice, especially given the fact that such disorders themselves put children at risk for heavy marijuana use, addiction, and problems later in life.  
 
They note there is not only a lack of evidence showing efficacy for treatment with marijuana but also a growing body of evidence linking marijuana use to “long-term and potentially irreversible adverse physical, neurocognitive, psychiatric, and psychosocial outcomes.”
 
The lay press has exacerbated the situation, they say, by reporting studies in animals or case studies involving just one person as conclusive evidence that marijuana is safe, effective, and should be used medically. Further, parent advocacy groups formed on social media push legislators to act based on anecdotal evidence, but not scientific proof. Some even partner with private, for-profit groups that stand to gain financially from such arrangements.
 
Marijuana “cannot be safely recommended for the treatment of developmental or behavioral disorders,” including autism at this time, they conclude.
 
Read study here.                                  Our thanks to Dr. Gregg Raduka for providing this article. 
 
 
Colorado Health Agency Issues Second Report on Health Effects of Marijuana in State
 
Since the state legalized marijuana for recreational use, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has issued a report on marijuana and health every two years. Colorado legalized recreational pot in 2012 to go into effect in 2014. This is the second health report.
 
The report contains a huge amount of data. An executive summary appears on pages 1-6.
 
The most startling data about the consequences of legalization are the number of marijuana-related hospitalizations that have occurred from 2000, the year Colorado legalized marijuana for medical use to September 2015, 21 months after recreational legalization began.
 
A graph showing rates of these hospitalizations by age is pictured below. They are rates per 100,000 and have nearly doubled among adolescents and quintupled among young adults. A graph of the data broken down by race on page 291 of the report are equally stunning.
 
Read report here.



The Marijuana Report is a weekly e-newsletter published by National Families in Action in partnership with SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana). Visit our website, The Marijuana Report.Org, to learn more about the marijuana story unfolding across the nation.
 
SUBSCRIBE to The Marijuana Report.
SUBSCRIBE to Spanish edition of The Marijuana Report.
 
About National Families in Action (NFIA)
NFIA consists of families, scientists, business leaders, physicians, addiction specialists, policymakers, and others committed to protecting children from addictive drugs. Our vision is:
  • Healthy, drug-free kids
  • Nurturing, addiction-free families
  • Scientifically accurate information and education
  • A nation free of Big Marijuana
  • Smart, safe, FDA-approved medicines developed from the cannabis plant (and other plants) 
  • Expanded access to medicines in FDA clinical trials for children with epilepsy 
About SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana)
SAM is a nonpartisan alliance of lawmakers, scientists and other concerned citizens who want to move beyond simplistic discussions of "incarceration versus legalization" when discussing marijuana use and instead focus on practical changes in marijuana policy that neither demonizes users nor legalizes the drug. SAM supports a treatment, health-first marijuana policy.  SAM has four main goals:
  • To inform public policy with the science of today's marijuana.
  • To reduce the unintended consequences of current marijuana policies, such as lifelong stigma due to arrest.
  • To prevent the establishment of "Big Marijuana" - and a 21st-Century tobacco industry that would market marijuana to children.
  • To promote research of marijuana's medical properties and produce, non-smoked, non-psychoactive pharmacy-attainable medications.
National Families
National Families
National Families
National Families
National Families
National Families
The MJ Report
The MJ Report
The MJ Report
The MJ Report
The MJ Report
The MJ Report
SAM
SAM
SAM
SAM
SAM
SAM
Copyright © 2017 National Families in Action, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences