In this newsletter, you will find news about Tobin Project activities and highlights of recent research from scholars in the network.
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National Security


The Next Great War? The Roots of World War I and the Risk of U.S.-China Conflict

How did World War I start, and what lessons does this history hold for today’s rivalry between the United States and China? This volume, edited by Richard Rosecrance and Steven Miller, with contributions from Tobin network scholars Steven Van Evera, Graham Allison, and Joseph Nye, suggests that some of the factors that led to the Great War are still present today. For example, Miller writes in the introduction that while “bellicist” beliefs about the glory and inevitably of war have greatly diminished in the last century, both China and the United States have Asian allies that could pull them into a larger war, just as the major European powers did in 1914.
[Read an excerpt] [More about the book]
 

Mixed Signals: IMF Lending and Capital Markets

IMF crisis lending is meant to restore confidence in a country’s finances and catalyze private lending, but it does not always function as intended, write Terrence Chapman, Songying Fang, Xin Li, and Randall Stone. While such a loan should restore liquidity and assure capital markets that the country is pursuing sound economic policies, accepting the loan may also signal to investors that a country is economically weak. Indeed, they find that new IMF program announcements, on net, cause sovereign bond yields to increase. The researchers also suggest that the IMF may not enforce demands for policy reform directed at powerful or well-connected countries. Although announcements of larger IMF loans with stricter conditions lead to greater reductions in sovereign bond yields, this effect can be undercut if the target country is important to the U.S. (which holds the most power in the IMF).
[Read the paper]
 

Indirect Rule and Varieties of Governance

In this paper, Adnan Naseemullah and Paul Staniland argue that the long-used dichotomy between “direct” and “indirect” rule glosses over important variation in types of indirect rule. They construct a typology of indirect rule that ranges from “suzerain” governance, in which a polity rules its own internal affairs but still owes allegiance to an imperial power, to “de jure” governance, in which the state maintains the appearance of direct rule, but power is actually exercised through local intermediaries. Using South Asia as an example, they show that examining variation in indirect rule in colonial states can help us understand the diverse forms of governance that exist in many postcolonial states today.
[Read the paper]
National Security
Government & Markets
Institutions of Democracy
Economic Inequality

Do you have any new work you would like to share with the network? Email us!


News from the Tobin Project

 

Applications Open for Two Graduate Student Programs

The Tobin Project is now accepting applications for two programs: the Graduate Student Forum and Fellowship and the new Prospectus Development Workshop. We encourage you to share these opportunities with exceptional graduate students.

Graduate Student Forum and Fellowship

The Tobin Project is now accepting applications for the 2015-16 Graduate Student Forum and Fellowship program from doctoral and professional students currently undertaking research on real-world problems related to the Tobin Project’s core research areas. The program will support fellows with grants of up to $2,000 and monthly discussions of participants' work during the coming academic year. Limited travel funding is also available.
[More information and application instructions]

Prospectus Development Workshop

The Tobin Project will hold a Prospectus Development Workshop this summer, and we seek applications from doctoral students currently developing research questions and aiming to produce high-impact social science research related to our core research areas. The workshop will take place on May 29-31, 2015, in Cambridge, MA. The Tobin Project will cover the costs of travel, lodging, and meals and will provide a $500 stipend.
[More information and application instructions]

Leadership Opportunity at the Tobin Project

The Tobin Project seeks a Director of Operations to serve as a member of its leadership team and to oversee daily operations and strategic development. The start date is spring/summer 2015. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, but candidates are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. We would appreciate if you could please refer interested candidates to the posting below for more information.
[Full job posting]


Email Us About Your Research

 

 Government & Markets

Resisting the Iron Cage: The Effects of Bureaucratic Reforms to Promote Equity
Can bureaucratic reforms help increase diversity in management? Frank Dobbin, Daniel Schrage, and Alexandra Kalev show that many common reforms meant to limit managers’ hiring discretion (such as job tests and performance evaluations) often reduce diversity. The researchers hypothesize that this is due to backlash from managers who experience loss in autonomy, although external oversight moderates this effect. On the other hand, they find that reforms that engage managers in increasing diversity without limiting their options, such as special recruitment and training programs for women and minorities, do increase diversity.
[Read the paper]

 Institutions of Democracy

Persuasion within Small Deliberative Groups: A Randomized Field Experiment on Fiscal Policy Discussion
Using a field experiment from a series of town hall meetings on American fiscal policy, Kevin Esterling, Archon Fung, and Taeku Lee find evidence that participating in small-group discussions can persuade participants to shift their political ideology and beliefs about specific policies. This is especially true when participants rate those discussions as highly “informative.” Running counter to a large existing literature, the researchers find that this can occur without ideological polarization, and suggest it may be an effect of structuring and designing the discussions to emphasize careful deliberation.
[Read the paper]

 Economic Inequality

The Engagement Gap: Social Mobility and Extracurricular Participation among American Youth
Using survey data, Kaisa Snellman, Jennifer Silva, Carl Frederick, and Robert Putnam show that the gap in extracurricular activity participation between rich and poor students has significantly increased in the last several decades. They attribute this in large part to the growth of economic inequality and increasing investments by wealthy parents in their children, and argue that this should cause serious concern. Extracurricular activities are not frivolous pursuits for children, they write. Because these activities matter for admission to elite colleges and for building teamwork and social skills, they could have a significant impact on social mobility.
[Read the paper]
This email was sent to t.chapman@austin.utexas.edu
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Tobin Project · 1 Mifflin Place Suite 240 · Cambridge, MA 02138 · USA

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In this newsletter, you will find news about Tobin Project activities and highlights of recent research from scholars in the network.
View this email in your browser

National Security


The Next Great War? The Roots of World War I and the Risk of U.S.-China Conflict

How did World War I start, and what lessons does this history hold for today’s rivalry between the United States and China? This volume, edited by Richard Rosecrance and Steven Miller, with contributions from Tobin network scholars Steven Van Evera, Graham Allison, and Joseph Nye, suggests that some of the factors that led to the Great War are still present today. For example, Miller writes in the introduction that while “bellicist” beliefs about the glory and inevitably of war have greatly diminished in the last century, both China and the United States have Asian allies that could pull them into a larger war, just as the major European powers did in 1914.
[Read an excerpt] [More about the book]
 

Mixed Signals: IMF Lending and Capital Markets

IMF crisis lending is meant to restore confidence in a country’s finances and catalyze private lending, but it does not always function as intended, write Terrence Chapman, Songying Fang, Xin Li, and Randall Stone. While such a loan should restore liquidity and assure capital markets that the country is pursuing sound economic policies, accepting the loan may also signal to investors that a country is economically weak. Indeed, they find that new IMF program announcements, on net, cause sovereign bond yields to increase. The researchers also suggest that the IMF may not enforce demands for policy reform directed at powerful or well-connected countries. Although announcements of larger IMF loans with stricter conditions lead to greater reductions in sovereign bond yields, this effect can be undercut if the target country is important to the U.S. (which holds the most power in the IMF).
[Read the paper]
 

Indirect Rule and Varieties of Governance

In this paper, Adnan Naseemullah and Paul Staniland argue that the long-used dichotomy between “direct” and “indirect” rule glosses over important variation in types of indirect rule. They construct a typology of indirect rule that ranges from “suzerain” governance, in which a polity rules its own internal affairs but still owes allegiance to an imperial power, to “de jure” governance, in which the state maintains the appearance of direct rule, but power is actually exercised through local intermediaries. Using South Asia as an example, they show that examining variation in indirect rule in colonial states can help us understand the diverse forms of governance that exist in many postcolonial states today.
[Read the paper]
National Security
Government & Markets
Institutions of Democracy
Economic Inequality

Do you have any new work you would like to share with the network? Email us!


News from the Tobin Project

 

Applications Open for Two Graduate Student Programs

The Tobin Project is now accepting applications for two programs: the Graduate Student Forum and Fellowship and the new Prospectus Development Workshop. We encourage you to share these opportunities with exceptional graduate students.

Graduate Student Forum and Fellowship

The Tobin Project is now accepting applications for the 2015-16 Graduate Student Forum and Fellowship program from doctoral and professional students currently undertaking research on real-world problems related to the Tobin Project’s core research areas. The program will support fellows with grants of up to $2,000 and monthly discussions of participants' work during the coming academic year. Limited travel funding is also available.
[More information and application instructions]

Prospectus Development Workshop

The Tobin Project will hold a Prospectus Development Workshop this summer, and we seek applications from doctoral students currently developing research questions and aiming to produce high-impact social science research related to our core research areas. The workshop will take place on May 29-31, 2015, in Cambridge, MA. The Tobin Project will cover the costs of travel, lodging, and meals and will provide a $500 stipend.
[More information and application instructions]

Leadership Opportunity at the Tobin Project

The Tobin Project seeks a Director of Operations to serve as a member of its leadership team and to oversee daily operations and strategic development. The start date is spring/summer 2015. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, but candidates are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. We would appreciate if you could please refer interested candidates to the posting below for more information.
[Full job posting]


Email Us About Your Research

 

 Government & Markets

Resisting the Iron Cage: The Effects of Bureaucratic Reforms to Promote Equity
Can bureaucratic reforms help increase diversity in management? Frank Dobbin, Daniel Schrage, and Alexandra Kalev show that many common reforms meant to limit managers’ hiring discretion (such as job tests and performance evaluations) often reduce diversity. The researchers hypothesize that this is due to backlash from managers who experience loss in autonomy, although external oversight moderates this effect. On the other hand, they find that reforms that engage managers in increasing diversity without limiting their options, such as special recruitment and training programs for women and minorities, do increase diversity.
[Read the paper]

 Institutions of Democracy

Persuasion within Small Deliberative Groups: A Randomized Field Experiment on Fiscal Policy Discussion
Using a field experiment from a series of town hall meetings on American fiscal policy, Kevin Esterling, Archon Fung, and Taeku Lee find evidence that participating in small-group discussions can persuade participants to shift their political ideology and beliefs about specific policies. This is especially true when participants rate those discussions as highly “informative.” Running counter to a large existing literature, the researchers find that this can occur without ideological polarization, and suggest it may be an effect of structuring and designing the discussions to emphasize careful deliberation.
[Read the paper]

 Economic Inequality

The Engagement Gap: Social Mobility and Extracurricular Participation among American Youth
Using survey data, Kaisa Snellman, Jennifer Silva, Carl Frederick, and Robert Putnam show that the gap in extracurricular activity participation between rich and poor students has significantly increased in the last several decades. They attribute this in large part to the growth of economic inequality and increasing investments by wealthy parents in their children, and argue that this should cause serious concern. Extracurricular activities are not frivolous pursuits for children, they write. Because these activities matter for admission to elite colleges and for building teamwork and social skills, they could have a significant impact on social mobility.
[Read the paper]
This email was sent to t.chapman@austin.utexas.edu
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Tobin Project · 1 Mifflin Place Suite 240 · Cambridge, MA 02138 · USA