JUNE 2015                             Download [pdf]        
View this email in your browser
 
Dear polio eradication supporter,

 
In June, we recognize the importance of strong surveillance systems in ending polio once and for all. The diligence of countless individuals to find, test and respond to potential polio cases around the world is essential to stopping the spread of the disease. In the Horn of Africa and central Africa, this work helped to contain the virus after the 2013 polio outbreak, and as a result, transmission was deemed to have been stopped in Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia and Kenya. Also this month, the programme took a step back to evaluate the global polio eradication endgame strategy. The review concluded that the plan’s framework for eradication is strong, but there is need for renewed focus on improving surveillance and reaching every last child.
 

 HOW SURVEILLANCE WORKS

To find and stop polio, a huge network of individuals must work together to root out the virus wherever it hides. A chain of community leaders, doctors, surveillance medical officers, laboratory officials, statisticians, traditional healers, teachers, parents and countless others work together to investigate every case of acute flaccid paralysis, the symptom of polio. Finding a child suffering from acute flaccid paralysis sets the surveillance cycle in motion, activating the chain of committed volunteers and staff members. Each identified case brings us one step closer to a world where children are free from the threat of polio.

Identifying cases of polio is crucial to track and stop the virus.  © Gavi

 

CONTAINING A POLIO OUTBREAK: HORN OF AFRICA AND CENTRAL AFRICA

This month Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia and Kenya were all declared to have stopped the transmission of polio by independent assessment teams. In 2013, two major polio outbreaks occurred in Africa, paralyzing over two hundred children in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia and 14 across Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. The Governments of the affected countries and international partners quickly mobilized to mount a coordinated response to the outbreaks, working tirelessly to find the virus and vaccinate children across the region, facing challenging environments and insecurity in some places. Now, two years later, strengthened surveillance systems and raised immunity levels have stopped these outbreaks; yet the need for continued vigilance against the virus remains. Read more on the Equatorial Guinea outbreak closure.

A child in Ethiopia receives the oral polio vaccine, protecting him against the virus. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2014/Sewunet

 

REVIEW OF THE POLIO ERADICATION AND ENDGAME STRATEGIC PLAN

 
In 2013, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative undertook an ambitious new strategic plan that laid out the path to end polio forever by 2018. Now, two years into its implementation, partners and stakeholders are holding an in-depth midterm review of progress and challenges to achieve that goal. Initial findings show that the strategic plan is providing a strong framework for eradication. However, improved surveillance and campaign quality are necessary to finish the job.  
 

Improving campaign quality to protect children against polio is essential for maintaining and building on the gains made to date.    © Gavi
 

GLOBAL VOICES IN SUPPORT OF POLIO ERADICATION

 
This month, political support for the eradication of polio was reiterated around the world. Ministers of Foreign Affairs from the Organization of Islamic Cooperation voiced their support for polio eradication activities and advocated for continued commitments to the GPEI. European Union parliamentarians signed their names to a declaration stressing the critical importance of eradicating polio in the pockets of the world where it still exists. Thirdly, the Assembly of the African Union adopted  a declaration that reaffirmed their commitment to helping to deliver a polio-free Africa as a historic legacy to children of all future generations.
 

JAPANESE PRIME MINISTER RECOGNIZED BY ROTARY

Rotary presented Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with the Polio Eradication Champion Award for his outstanding commitment to ending polio on 28 May 2015. Read more.

POLIO IN THE NEWS

 
AFP: Nigeria makes final push to stamp out polio
 
Deutsche Welle: Polio ebbs in Pakistan, but will the trend continue?
 
New York Times: Final salvos against polio

POLIO IN NUMBERS

Wild poliovirus in 2015

- Global Total:  29 (105) 
- Global WPV1: 29 (105)
- Global WPV3: 0 (0)
 

Endemic: 27 (93)

- Afghanistan: 4 (6)
- Nigeria: 0 (4) 
- Pakistan: 25 (83)
 

Importation Countries: 0 (12)


Data as of 23 June 2015. Numbers in brackets represent data this time in 2014.

Current case map
 
This month, the monthly statement from Polio Oversight Board chair Dr Tom Frieden discusses the role of the Global Polio Laboratory Network.

 

FUNDING UPDATES

Rotary released US$ 34.8 million for polio immunization, surveillance and research activities in ten countries, as well as to provide technical assistance to additional countries in Africa. Read more.

The World Bank has approved US$ 200 million of International Development Association additional funding to eradicate polio and sustain routine immunization in Nigeria. Read more.
 
The Islamic Development Bank has released the final tranche of their                US$ 20 655 875 loan to Pakistan to the World Health Organization for polio surveillance and immunization activities in Pakistan. Read more.
 

Countries Introducing the Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) into Routine Immunization systems this month

Cote d’Ivoire, Grenada, Kiribati, Lesotho, Nauru, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, the Sudan and Tuvalu introduced IPV this month.
 
Eighty nine countries have introduced IPV to date (46 % of the global total due to introduce the vaccine in 2015).
 
Eleven countries are due to introduce IPV in July.
Share
Tweet
Forward
Copyright © 2015 Global Polio Eradication Initiative, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences