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Your Graduate Reseach News

Graduate Research News

November-December 2021

We have almost made it through another challenging year and I am sure you are all looking forward to a break over summer, as am I. But it's not over yet and there is still plenty coming your way in the next few weeks.
The Professional Development training calendar is packed full of great sessions. My top picks this month are  Network your way into a job using PostAc with Prof Inger Mewburn (aka Thesis Whisperer) on 26 November and Ready to publish: Choosing where to publish on 8 December.  There are also lots of writing group sessions and a Bootcamp so why not give your writing a booster before you take a well earned break.

I'd also like to bring to your attention a lovely reflective piece in this issue written by research candidate Sally Mordike. We would love to have more contributions from students and staff in future issues--about your research or about your journey. 

It has been brought to my attention that the names of a number of candidates who had been approved to graduate were missed from previous issues. My sincere apologies to Debbi Stockhammer, William Playford, Jessica Wise, Tuan Dung Pham, Sashika Don, Mohammad Zuberali, Isabel Paton, Frank Thorn, Georgia Tziros, Andrew Portman, Harry Moore, Anne Munro, Matthew O'Connell and Paula Pipan.  Your achievements have been recognised in this issue. 

As we come up to the holiday season and the end of 2021, the final issue of GRNews will be published on 22nd December and contributions from staff and students are most welcome. Please send them to jpodesta@csu.edu.au by COB Monday 20 December.. 
In this month's issue....
Library Buzz: How to build your profile as an academic researcher
As you embark on your research journey, it’s important that you establish your presence as an academic. Learn more...

Shut-up and Write
New session times on Wednesday evening and Saturday afternoons- perfect for those of you who are working or need an extra session. Find out more...

Research Skills, Academic Writing workshops and Professional Development 
The Research Professional Development calendar has a wide range of fantastic sessions to help you with your research, writing and just about everything else a researcher needs to know.  Coming up this month....

HDR Connect
Feeling disconnected, isolated or unsure about whether you are on the right track?  You are not alone. Why not join HDR Connect, an online group that meets fortnightly on a Thursday at 6pm. Find out more...
 
DocFest22 Save the Date!
Plans are underway for our annual HDR Conference, DocFest, Full details will be available in the coming months.  Dates here...

‘Doing our bit for the environment’: Charles Sturt’s report against the Sustainable Development Goals
As the events and outcomes of COP26 unfolded, we were reminded of some of the challenges that we face as an international community. Sustainability is one of the very foundations of Charles Sturt University. That is why the university has released its inaugural report against the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Read more...

A doctoral qualification, while working with primary producers and industry partners? 
The Southern NSW Drought Resilience Adoption and Innovation Hub is looking for prospective PhD candidates.  Find out more...


Reflections on the PhD journey
Sally Mordike is in her first year of candidature through the School of Theology and shares a reflection on her PhD journey.  Read more... 



Candidate News

We acknowledge and welcome new candidates and celebrate those who have recently submitted their thesis or are set to graduate. Read more...

PGSA new membership link 
The Post-graduate Student Association now has its own membership hub with CSU Clubs. Membership is free so join us now 

Making Microsoft Word more user-friendly
CSU’s research editor Mark Filmer reviews two software tools that will improve your experience of using Microsoft Word. Learn more...

More internship opportunities through APR.Intern 

APR.Intern is continuing to facilitate 3-6 month, paid PhD student internships with several opportunities closing soon. Find out more....



Graduate Researcher Experience Survey 2021
Our annual survey where you  tell us about your HDR experience is now open until 10 December. Make sure your voice is heard.  Learn more here...

Making Microsoft Word more user-friendly
CSU’s research editor Mark Filmer reviews two software tools that will improve your experience of using Microsoft Word.
Love it or hate it, Microsoft Word is part of most people’s professional lives. If you are writing anything other than an email, you will probably be using Word.
I’ve never been a big fan of Word, partly because I use an Apple computer at home and the Mac version of Word has always been clunky. By that I mean slow and not as aesthetically pleasing or customisable as the Windows version. (There are some extensions that are not available for the Mac version, as most developers focus on the more popular Windows version.)
However, the Windows version of Word is solid and fast. I’ve come to like using it for the proofreading and editing work I do. Microsoft has optimised Word to run on Windows, so it is much faster and easier to use on a PC than a Mac. It also has a much more aesthetically pleasing user interface on Windows.
Irrespective of which platform you use, there are several tools I’ve discovered over the years that make Word more efficient and user-friendly. Two of these tools are PopClip (for the Mac version of Word) and Pantherbar (for the Windows version).
These utilities essentially do the same thing. They operate in the background and take up virtually no space or memory. They are automatically triggered when you use the mouse to highlight some text in Word. When you do this, a small menu pops up, giving you the option to perform a range of tasks. The great thing about both applications is that the popup menu is fully customisable. PopClip has more than 200 extensions and Pantherbar has more than 80.
Examples of the plug-ins include making the selected text all caps, changing it to lower case, sentence case, or title case, inserting quote marks or brackets (round or square) at each end of the selected text, doing a dictionary search of the selected word, and searching the text in Google or Wikipedia. Pantherbar has a plug-in that allows you to select a reference and then check it in Google Scholar. (There is no equivalent plug-in for PopClip at this stage.) I’ve found this one particularly handy.
You might think this sounds a bit gimmicky. After all, how difficult is it to do your own search of Google Scholar? Of course, it’s not difficult. But the plug-in saves you several keystrokes and time. If you use Word and these tools regularly, you will simplify your workflow and save time.
Both applications are unobtrusive and run flawlessly. There offer free versions to try, but the full versions (allowing you to fully customise the apps) are paid (though relatively cheap) applications.
PopClip for Mac (pilotmoon.com) AUD $15 for the full version
Pantherbar – Quick actions for selected text (pantherbar-app.com) US $5 for the full version
In next month’s newsletter, I’ll review another time-saving utility that you can use in Word, and every other application.
The Southern NSW Drought Resilience Adoption and Innovation Hub is looking for prospective PhD candidates. 
Are you interested in gaining a doctoral qualification, while working with primary producers and industry partners?
Are you interested in delivering new ways of thinking that help producers and communities vulnerable to drought become more resilient and to flourish? Would you like to receive a stipend of $28,854 per annum (tax free*) while you undertake your research?
The Southern NSW Drought Resilience Adoption and Innovation Hub is looking for prospective PhD candidates.  

Find out more about this opportunity here.  Applications close 5.00pm AEDT Friday 23 December 2021.

 
Candidate News
Welcome to New Graduate Research Candidates!
Each issue we welcome new Graduate Research candidates and acknowledge the achievements of our current students from the previous month. (Please note that this is based on reporting up to and including 9th November)

In October we welcomed the following new candidates.


Faculty of Arts & Education
Janice Mills                 
Kaye Ervin                    
Muhammad Musharraf               

Faculty of Business, Justice & Behavioural Sciecnes
Javeriah Saleem             
Kristy Milligan     
Tony Ridley                   
 
Faculty of Science and Health
Colin Starkey                  
Bupe Kyelu       



Thesis set for examination
Congratulations to the following candidates who have recently submitted their thesis for examination.
           
Faculty of Arts and Education
Thomas Phillip                   School of Theology
Principal Supervisor: Dr Jeffery Aernie         
Thesis Title: Exegeting the World: M.M. Thomas's Secular Commentaries on Scripture

Faculty of Business, Justice and Behavioral Sciences
Abdul Wazirzada               School of Business
Principal Supervisor: Prof John Hicks

Adam Poulsen                    School of Computing, Mathematics and Engineering
Principal Supervisor: Prof Oliver Burmeister
Thesis Title: The Investigation of a New Care Robot Design Approach for Alleviating LGBT Elderly Loneliness

Julie McLean        School of Computing, Mathematics and Engineering
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Yeslam Moh’d Al-Saggaf
Thesis Title: Instagram photo sharing and its relationship with social connectedness, loneliness and well-being

John Edwards                     School of Management and Marketing
Principal Supervisor: Dr Tahmid Nayemm
Thesis Title: The relationships between the firm’s strategic behaviour, corporate entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial self-efficacy, entrepreneurial selling processes and B2B salesperson performance.

Faculty of Science and Health
Esther Fasoyin                   School of Dentistry and Medical Sciences
Principal Supervisor: Dr Uba Uba Nwose      
Thesis Title: Food knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and behaviour among women of reproductive age group (18-49 years) towards consumption of green leafy vegetables in Delta State Nigeria.


Approved to Graduate
Congratulations to the following candidates who have recently been approved to graduate and to their supervisors who have supported them on their journey. 

Faculty of Arts and Education
Mohammad Zuberali        Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation
Principal Supervisor: Zuleyha Keskin
Thesis title: Contemporary education for traditional ‘Ulama: A study of the Deobandi movement and curricular adaptation


Atilla Ergi           Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Salih Yucel
Thesis title: A Comparative Study on the Possible Coexistence of Destiny and Free Will with Detailed Analysis of Fethullah Gülen’s Perspective

John Grimes        School of Theology
Principal Supervisor: Dr Michael Gladwin
Thesis title: Anzac and the sacred: Australian religious experience and the Great War

Faculty of Business, Justice and Behavioral Sciences
Kathleen Clough        Australian Graduate School of Policing and Security
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Henry Prunckun
Thesis title: Eliminating Banknotes: Policy Considerations for Australian Tax Evasion

Faculty of Science and Health
Sashika Madhupani Yalage Don                    School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor: Prof Christopher Steel
Thesis title: The Aureobasidium pullulans volatile metabolome and potential antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata
 
Harry Moore       School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Dale Nimmo
Thesis title: Quantifying the habitat requirements of an endangered marsupial predator, the northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus)
 
Matthew O'Connell          School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Paul Humphries
Thesis title: Exploring the utility of taxidermy Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii) as a historical record
 
Paula Pipan          School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Andrew Hall
Thesis title: Effect of fine scale spatial sensitivity of climate metrics on predicted viticultural phenological development
 
Jessica Wise         School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor: Prof Kris Hughes
Thesis title: Equine gastric ulcer syndrome: Observer reliability in ulcer grading and investigation of pharmacological and clinical influences on gastric pH

Jhoana Opena     School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor:Prof Jim Pratley
Thesis title: Impacts of pasture legume phase on the seedbank, establishment, and growth of barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli) in drill-sown rice.
 
Julia Gouot          School of Agriculture, Environmental and Veterinary Science
Principal Supervisor:Dr Celia Barril
Thesis title: Effect of high and extreme high temperatures on berry tannin composition in Vitis vinifera cv. Shiraz

 Isabel Anne Paton       School of Community Health
Principal Supervisor: Aspro Narelle Patton
Thesis title: The development of allied health students’ collaborative practice capability in higher education
 
Georgia Tziros     School of Nursing, Paramedicine and Healthcare Sciences
Thesis title: Principal Supervisor: Aspro Maree Bernoth
Greek Migration Experiences and Later Life Emotional Wellbeing: A Qualitative Study
 
Andrew Portman               School of Dentistry and Medical Sciences
Principal Supervisor: Prof Chris Blanchard
Thesis title: The effects of lentil flour substitution on composition, rheology and product quality of baked and extruded products
 
Debbi Stockhammer          School of Dentistry and Medical Sciences
Principal Supervisor: Dr Thiru Vanniasinkiam
Thesis title: Nuts to You, Life Changing for Me
 
Doing our bit for the environment: Charles Sturt’s report against the Sustainable Development Goals

As the events and outcomes of COP26 in Glasgow unfolded, we were reminded of some of the challenges that we face as an international community. The COP26 summit brought 40 countries together to accelerate action towards the goals of the Paris Agreement and UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Basically, these parties join forces to stress the importance of doing more for the future of the globe.
Sustainability is one of the very foundations of Charles Sturt University. That is why the university has released its inaugural report against the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
The SDGs provide our global blueprint to build prosperity while protecting the planet. Charles Sturt is a signatory to the University Commitment to the SDGs and is committed to lead by example. Research directed by Charles Sturt graduates is one way the university hopes to achieve its SDGs.
 Inside the covers of Charles Sturt’s SDG Report, you will find a diverse range of case studies showcasing how Charles Sturt is contributing to ending poverty, protecting the planet and improving the lives and prospects of individuals and communities.
 

Professor Michael Friend, Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research said, “It’s very pleasing to be associated with the release of this report. These case studies provide concrete examples of how Charles Sturt continues to drive regional outcomes with global impact”.
“Examples range from our role in providing sector-leading participation in tertiary education among Indigenous Australians and other underrepresented individuals within our community, to improving access to quality healthcare in regional Australia, and supporting industry and communities to be better prepared in the face of a changing climate”.
 “This is the very kind of impact that motivates me and my colleagues to excel as educators, researchers and community leaders. Our role in progressing the SDGs aligns very much with our purpose as an institution and we will continue to work hard to actively collaborate with others to deliver on these goals”.
 
Take a closer look at the SDG Report.
Reflections on the PhD journey
They say that you must love what you are studying if you are to do a PhD. It’s a hard slog, it’s tough, you’ll find it hard going. So as I applied for scholarships and mulled over potential topics, I did wonder: do I really want to embark on this journey, which would be financially, personally and intellectually challenging?
When I was growing up, I noticed something about my dad. Whenever Mum was away, and he was able to choose to do whatever he wanted in his evenings, he would do work. He would have several jobs on the go, and spread out all over the house with papers, notes, files, and drawings. The whole house would become his study, and he was like a pig in clover, happily moving from task to task. It did mean that we had a massive clean-up to do before Mum returned – but I found out something really important about my dad: he loved what he did. He loved the intellectual challenge, the necessary precision, the attention to detail, and the people he was helping. 
I used to want a job like my dad’s: he really enjoyed his work. He had this way of whistling through his teeth whilst he was working away at something he liked – when he was sketching a complex diagram, or putting finishing touches to a precise specification. He knew the satisfaction of a job not only completed, but accomplished – to the best of his ability, with extra care and attention to detail.
It’s no surprise I’ve inherited his perfectionist streak – I’ve seen the joy that can come from doing something really well, when that ‘something’ is meaningful for you, when you can get ‘lost’ in the task, when time is immaterial, you’re in the flow and hours may go by and you just don’t notice. Even now, in his 80s, if Mum is out or away, Dad will bring out a complex case, or something interesting to tackle, and whistle his way through sorting it out.
So I was just delighted the other day when I had a morning to myself – bliss! – a Saturday morning, with the whole family gone for a long walk. This is rare in my house at the moment, as both my adult children are living and working at home, so the majority of the time there’s always someone around. What would I do? I could potter in the garden, cook up a mess in the kitchen, spread out my sewing… but I found that what I really wanted to do was head to my desk, settle down, and immerse myself in uni work. I wanted to read, to think, to explore, to ponder, and was spoilt for choice on what my focus would be. Would I read up for the lecture I needed to give the following week, or tackle my definition of spirituality? Borrow more books from the library, or read the books I’d already borrowed? Really get my head around dementia research, or dive into the unfamiliar world of theological anthropology? The work sat there, ready, waiting for me to decide.
And then it struck me – I was just like my dad! I realised with pleasure that I, too, had found my passion, what captured my interest, what I get lost in – and it was my work. My wish had come true: this PhD was life-giving for me, it was worthwhile, meaningful, and had potential to make a difference in the world. I was stoked.
And I realised there was something important I needed to do. It was time to learn how to whistle through my teeth.
Sally Mordike
Sally is in her first year of HDR candidature through the School of Theology in the Faculty of Arts and Education. She is investigating the meaning of home for older people living with dementia.
Can we help you?
The HDR journey is a long and often challenging one and we are ready to support you along the way. Please reach out if we can help you. As well as your supervisors or Sub-Dean (Graduate Studies) there are several places you can go for help or support during your studies.  
Professional Development, Research Skills
and Academic Writing Workshops
What's on offer this month on the Research Training Calendar?
There are lot's of great sessions coming up over the next month.  Click on the session to register and receive the Zoom meeting links.

25th Nov 2021   Databases and SQL, by Intersect
A relational database is an extremely efficient, fast and widespread means of storing structured data and Structured Query Language (SQL) is the standard means for reading from and writing to databases. Databases use multiple tables, linked by well-defined relationships to store large amounts of data without needless repetition while maintaining the integrity of your data. Moving from spreadsheets and text documents to a structured relational database can be a steep learning curve, but one that will reward you many time over in speed, efficiency and power. The registration link will provide further details. (3 hrs, 0930-1230 AEST). Remember to save the ics file to your calendar.

25th Nov 2021   Shut Up & Write
Shut Up & Write sessions are held regularly on-line to help you focus your writing efforts in a supportive small group. These sessions: help your research writing to be more focused, efficient, and effective; protect or ‘quarantine’ time for your research writing, away from distractions; build a sense of community around your writing; and help overcome procrastination and increase motivation. No need to register, just pop this link and reminder into your calendar - https://charlessturt.zoom.us/j/62521890840?pwd=aDFzYXMzTlY5cWJsbWw2OVVpSFZ5Zz09They are held: Mondays and Thursdays 1000-1200, Tuesdays 1400-1600, Wednesdays 1900-2100

25th Nov 2021   Writing a Research Proposal
The Research Proposal outlines what, why and how of your research. As the first major milestone for HDR students, the Research Proposal is important for convincing the research community that you understand the process of scholarly enquiry and that you have a project that is both viable and feasible. This session focuses on the purpose, structure, language and writing of a Research Proposal. We review past Research Proposals to better understand their purpose and key components and learn strategies for structuring and writing your own. (1300-1500 AEST, 2hrs)

25th Nov 2021   HDR Connect
Welcome to our informal group, HDR Connect - a meeting place for all Higher Degree by Research (HDR) and Honours students.  We catch up fortnightly via zoom and chat about anything research related. Some folks share how they are going, what they are up to, some share their wins and wisdom, some seek advice on a challenge, and some join in just to know they are not alone in their journey. Some are regulars, some drop in when they want to, everyone is welcome, any-time. We look forward to connecting with you.  (60 minutes, every second Thursday evening, 1800-1900 AEST)

26th Nov 2021   Qualitative Research Methods
This seminar is part of the Research Skills Seminar Series 20201 from the CAHS Research Education Program. Seminar Synopsis: The use of qualitative research methods is becoming more popular in health either as the primary research method or as part of a mixed methods approach to investigating a health issue. This seminar covers the benefits of using qualitative research; some of the myths associated with the use of qualitative research; the types of qualitative methods; how data is collected and analysed; and how the research prepares to use qualitative research to improve health outcomes for individuals, families and communities. (60 mins, 1030 - 1130 AEST) Presented by - Dr Shirley McGough - Lecturer, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University

26th Nov 2021   Network your way into a job using PostAc
At least three out of four jobs are never advertised - most people find jobs through word of mouth and personal recommendations. Our aim is to help you find a job you love within six months by growing and mobilising the power of PostAc and your professional networks. These techniques work for finding an academic or non-academic job. In the workshop we will cover: Identifying potential employers (generating a ‘cold call list’), leveraging your existing network (without losing friends), asking for and conducting ‘informational interviews’ (without fear or embarrassment), feeding and growing your network (or ‘earning the right to ask a favour’). This session will be delivered by Professor Inger Mewburn.  (60 mins, 1200-1300 AEST)

27th Nov 2021   Saturday Shut Up & Write!
An afternoon writing session on a Saturday! Please register and we'll see you there. (3 hours, 1400-1700 AEST)

29th Nov 2021   Writing Bootcamp
A welcoming writing group for anyone who wishes to allocate specific writing time, in a supportive 'on-line' group environment. Participants say they find these meetings useful to: make research writing more focused, efficient or effective protect or allocate specific time for research writing, creating an obligatory practice, away from distractions and in a supportive group build a sense of community around writing to help overcome procrastination and increase motivation. See you there.  (1000-1600 AEST)

29th Nov 2021   So, you’re graduating your PhD in a pandemic, what’s next?
Covid-19 presents a massive disruption to the academic workforce. PhD students and early career researchers are worried about their future career prospects inside academia and confused about their options outside the university walls. In this one hour lecture I use our team’s research on the post-PhD job market to: Enhance your understanding of the changed academic job market, analysing the effects of hiring freezes and travel restrictions. Increase awareness of career opportunities in industry; which sectors are looking for research talent? Help you approach the non-academic job market with more confidence. This session will be delivered by Professor Inger Mewburn.  (60 mins, 1200-1300 AEST)

30th Nov 2021   Shut Up & Write
Shut Up & Write sessions are held regularly on-line to help you focus your writing efforts in a supportive small group.

1st Dec 2021      Grammar Café - Verb tenses in English
Verbs help to encode actions, meanings, and relationships between things. Consistency of verb tense helps ensure smooth expression in your writing and improve the coherence of your argument. The practice of the discipline for which you write typically determines which verb tenses to use in various parts of your thesis. In general, however, this workshop will use practical tips and guides to help you know when to use past and present tense and in which chapter. It discusses how to avoid unnecessary shifts in verb tense within a paragraph or in adjacent paragraphs to help ensure smooth expression. If you need to improve your knowledge of grammar and mechanics and the clarity of your written expression, this workshop is for you.  (90 mins, 0930-1100 AEST) (90 mins, 1330-1500 AEST)

1st Dec 2021      Raising your research profile – Using social media to build your research profile
Do you want to have as much impact and reach with your research as possible? In an increasingly competitive academic research and scholarship environment, how do you distinguish yourself from your research peers? Conducting research is just one part of being an effective and productive researcher. To be competitive in academia and show the uniqueness of you and your research, you need to build and present a visible online profile that makes it easy for others to find you and cite you correctly. Your research profile showcases your work to the world. In this workshop we discuss 'what counts'; knowing what is valued in academic research and our institutions, and how your value is measured. We discuss compiling the most relevant information about you and your research into digestible bits of information that highlight contributions to research. This workshop is limited to 20 participants and is facilitated by Dr Jenine Beekhuyzen of Adroit Research, please email her with any questions - info@adroitresearch.com.au with the subject line: CSU workshop. (2 hours, 1000-1200 (AEST)

1st Dec 2021      Grammar Café - Articles
Many languages do not use articles (a, an, & the), or if they do exist, they may be used differently than in English. Multilingual writers often find article usage to be one of the most difficult concepts to master. Although there are some rules about article usage to help, there are also quite a few exceptions. Learning to use articles accurately is the focus of this workshop. It discusses common errors of article usage using practical examples and resources to help improve your academic writing skills. (90 mins, 1330-1500 AEST)

1st Dec 2021      Shut Up & Write

2nd Dec 2021    HDR Candidate Induction
Welcome to Charles Sturt.  This Induction session is for all new HDR Candidates It has a variety of presenters from the Research Office and Library who share essential information about getting started - what you need to know, the support services available to you, your key relationships, working well with your supervisor team, setting expectations, knowing your responsibilities, the professional development opportunities available to you and more. This session also forms part of your probationary requirements.  (2.5 hours, 0930-1200 AEST)

2nd Dec 2021    Shut Up & Write

6th Dec 2021     Shut Up & Write

7th Dec 2021     Shut Up & Write

8th Dec 2021     NVivo
As a prerequisite to this session, you are required to review some materials. You will find the link in the registration questions.  This workshop will then move you beyond basic coding with a range of queries to help identify patterns in data. Queries are powerful and assist the researcher to move beyond basic coding to use their classifications to produce visualisations. Reports are also covered. We work with a sample data set; however, you are encouraged to work with your own coded data set if desired (literature or empirical data). It is OK if you don't have coded data as the workshop gives insight into what is possible when you reach that stage. This workshop is limited to 15 participants and is facilitated by Dr Jenine Beekhuyzen of Adroit Research, please email her with any questions - info@adroitresearch.com.au with the subject line: CSU workshop.  (3 hours, 1000-1300 AEST)

8th Dec 2021     Ready to publish: Choosing where to publish
Almost ready to publish and want to know how to choose the best option for you and your work?  We will show you tips, tricks, and resources, including metrics and how to identify reputable publishers. (60 minutes, 1400-1500 AEST)

8th Dec 2021     Shut Up & Write

9th Dec 2021     Shut Up & Write

9th Dec 2021     Using NVivo to analyse social media – capturing social media data
You find yourself sitting on a goldmine of research data from in-depth interviews, detailed focus groups, with survey results alongside supporting observations and a comprehensive literature review. But you wonder, is there something missing? Could social media data add more depth to your analysis and understanding? This 'naturally occurring data' can highlight themes in threads and conversations that take place online in social media spaces such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. Imagine being able to track the transience of a natural disaster as it hits, or the reviews of a new piece of software released, or how people talk about religion in the digital age. All are possible. In this workshop, we introduce you to the benefits of using social media data to structure online content, helping you quickly unlock insights in your data. We discuss how to build social media into your research design, which platforms are worth concentrating on, and which tools and methods to use to collect and analyse the data. This workshop is limited to 20 participants and is facilitated by Dr Jenine Beekhuyzen of Adroit Research, please email her with any questions - info@adroitresearch.com.au with the subject line: CSU workshop. (2 hours, 1000-1200 (AEST)

9th Dec 2021     Ready to publish: What about Open Access?
Want to consider using an Open Access option for your publishing?  We will show you how to locate what is available, explain Open Access and what it is and how to identify reputable publishers, with added information on sharing resources.  (60 minutes, 1400-1500 AEST)

9th Dec 2021     HDR Connect
Welcome to our support group for all Higher Degree by Research (HDR) and Honours students as a place to connect, meet and discuss Research. HDR Connect is for all HDR and Honours students, meeting fortnightly via zoom. We'll connect with each other about how we are going and share our wins, our challenges and anything research related. Our meetings are also an opportunity to invite guest speakers on themed topics to help inform our practice, should this be helpful.  We look forward to connecting with you.  (60 minutes, 1600-1700 AEST)

11th Dec 2021   Saturday Shut Up & Write!
Please register and we'll see you there. (3 hours, 1400-1700 AEST)

14th Dec 2021   Presenting Research Metrics for Grants and Promotion
Are you looking to complete a grant application or application for promotion and want information about how to present your research impact? This session will show you how. Learn more about engaging with metrics to get the best possible outcome for your grant application or promotion. (60 mins, 0930-1030 AEST)

15th Dec 2021   Authorship and Copyright for a Thesis and other publications
Are you planning to include journal articles that you have written during your candidature, in your thesis? Are you planning to publish further works from your thesis?  This information session will support you to apply the appropriate copyright, Intellectual Property, Open Access and Creative Commons guidelines to your research outputs.   (60 mins, 1400-1500 AEST)

Join Shut Up and Write!

Join our community of researchers to progress your writing and research goals. No need to register for the weekly sessions, just turn up!   

We offered a Saturday SUW! for the first time on 4 September. Due to its popularity we are now offering this session fortnightly instead of monthly. You need to register to join this session via the PD calendar. 

SUW! Session  

Time 

Frequency 

Monday 

10:00-12:00 

Weekly 

Tuesday 

14:00-16:00 

Weekly 

Wednesday 

19:00-21:00 

Weekly 

Thursday 

10:00-12:00 

Weekly 

Saturday 

14:00-17:00 

Fortnightly 

Library Research Focus: How to build your profile as an academic researcher

As you embark on your research journey, it’s important that you establish your presence as an academic. If you want to share and promote your work, and build networks in your discipline, a strong researcher profile is essential. Read on for some quick tips about setting up researcher profiles.

Let’s start with ORCiD 
An ORCID ID is a unique, persistent identifier free of charge to researchers. Your ORCiD ID provides a persistent digital identity that allows you to identify your work from others with the same name. This unique identifier will stay with you throughout your research career.  ORCiD is widely used by publishers and research funding bodies such as the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and Australian Research Council  (ARC).   You can find out more about ORCiD and other Researcher Profiles in our library guide: Research Profiles   

You need to know about CRO
CRO is the Charles Sturt University Institutional Repository for all your research outputs.  Your CRO profile can include journal articles, books, conference papers and HDR theses.  CRO is both a repository for all your research, and a great resource it to search for other material for your research. To add your information into CRO you just need to log into PURE – you’ll find the login at the bottom of the page when you click on the link to CRO, or you can log in directly using the link on the Research Tab “Log in to CRO”. 

 
Are you on Google Scholar?
You can set up your own author profile on Google Scholar. You can keep it private, or make it public so you can be discovered by other scholars, or even employers. Your profile lists your publications and citations, and presents your h-index and i10-index.  You will need a Google Account to create a Google Scholar Profile. Find out more about creating a Google Scholar Profile .

Take a deeper dive into Researcher profiles
Discover Publons, Scopus, Academic Social Networks and more in our Library Guide to researcher profiles here

 
WANT TO SPEAK TO A LIBRARIAN? CLICK HERE FOR OUR DETAILS
 
A world of possibilities with paid PhD Internships

Australian Postgraduate Research Intern (APR.Intern) connects PhD students with industry through short-term 3-6 month internships. These opportunities empower students to thrive in a practical research environment and for businesses to innovate and be future-ready.
APR.Intern is Australia’s only not-for-profit PhD internship program that spans across all sectors, disciplines and universities and are supported by the Australian Government’s Department of Education and Training.
Bridging the gap between industry and academia, APR.Intern helps to create a level playing field for all PhD students — in particular, women and underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) including regional, Indigenous and disadvantaged students.
Find out currently available internships HERE 

FAQs
Is there any remuneration?

Yes, there is $3000 monthly stipend for the duration of the internship.
How will it impact on your PhD candidature?
If you successfully apply for an internship you have a number of options around how to manage your candidature.
  • Take one session of leave from your HDR programme. During this time, you will be enrolled in a ‘shell subject’ to ensure your enrolment with the university continues;
  • Move from full-time to part-time study: or
  • Undertake an internship during the examination period or other 'down' time during your candidature.
Can International students participate?
Yes, these are internships and are not considered to be ‘work’ and as such do not impact on visa restrictions.
I’m interested. What’s next?
Go to the APR.Intern website and see all of the current opportunities available.  Discuss your interest with your supervisor. Submit your application.

Read this interview with a Charles Sturt PhD candidate, Deb Metcalf, about her experience doing and internship with APR.Intern.


 
PostAc

Whilst opportunities in the academic job market post-thesis are getting harder to find that is not the case in the industry, business, and government sector. As we move towards a new year now is a great time to match your skills to great non-academic career. 
Increasingly the specialised skills of research graduates are highly sought after by non-academic employers and your dream job could be out there waiting for you. But how will you find it? the online jobs platform, PostAc is a great place to start.

When you do a PhD you are encouraged to develop a very narrow area of specialist expertise. We learn to think about ourselves as experts in a particular area, when really we are multi-talented, highly trained researchers who can use the skills we have developed doing a PhD to do all sorts of roles--inside and outside of academia. PostAc (developed by ANU) can help you to find those roles.








All CSU HDR students have free access to the PostAc platform and the training workshops and support they provide. You can login anytime using your @csu.edu.au email address, set up your profile (see instructions below) and test the platform out. See below for details of upcoming workshops you can attend. All sessions will be delivered by Professor Inger Mewburn.


So you’re graduating your PhD in a pandemic, what’s next?
Who? PhD students, post docs, supervisors and policy makers
How long? One hour lecture (40 minutes for the talk / 20 mins for Q&A)
How many? Up to 200 participants on Zoom. 
Covid-19 presents a massive disruption to the academic workforce. PhD students and early career researchers are worried about their future career prospects inside academia and confused about their options outside the university walls. In this one-hour lecture we use the team’s research on the post-PhD job market to:
  • Enhance your understanding of the changed academic job market, analysing the effects of hiring freezes and travel restrictions.
  • Increase awareness of career opportunities in industry; which sectors are looking for research talent?
  • Help you approach the non-academic job market with more confidence.
 29/11/2021 Monday 12:00-1pm https://anu.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cwlCo2IuFViazel

Instructions for creating your free PostAc account:
  1. Go to postac.com.au
  2. Click ‘make an account’ on the top right
  3. Fill in the form, using your university email account as the email address. Make sure your password is longer than 8 characters and has upper-case, lower case, a number and a symbol
  4. You will get an email from PostAc to say you have been successful
  5. Your account should be verified within 24 hours
If you have any problems making an account, email inger.mewburn@anu.edu.au
We want to hear from you!
The 2021 Graduate Researcher Experience Survey (GRES) is now out and we are hoping to receive responses from as many of our current Graduate Research candidates as possible. 
This annual survey gives all current Graduate Research candidates the opportunity to provide us with feedback about their HDR experiences, any gaps in our resources and support, and areas where we are doing well and where we can do better. For example, as part of our response to findings from GRES 2020 we have been working on how we deliver our professional development to make it easier for you to access given your busy lives. We are also working on making it easier for you find the information you need about your candidature and helping you to connect with your peers and research community. 
You will receive an email inviting you to participate in GRES 2021 and we encourage you to take a few minutes to complete the anonymous online survey. You can also go straight to the survey via the link below.
The survey closes on 10 December. Contact Jennifer Podesta if you have not received an email invitation and would like to participate.
Go to GRES 2021
DocFest22 HDR Conference - Save the Dates
 

Monday 23- Friday 27 May 2022
'Beyond the Doctoral Degree'
Are you looking to connect with other HDR candidates? 

Feeling isolate, disconnected, not sure if you are even on the right track?
HDR Connect
might be just what you are looking for! 
HDR Connect is a meeting place for all Higher Degree by Research (HDR) and Honours students. We  catch up fortnightly via zoom and chat about anything research related. Some folks share how they are going, what they are up to, some share their wins and wisdom, some seek advice on a challenge, and some join in just to know they are not alone in their journey. Some are regulars, some drop in when they want to, everyone is welcome, any-time. We look forward to connecting with you.  (60 minutes, every second Thursday  1800-1900 AEST
)

Next Meetings Thursday 30 September and 14 October - Join Zoom Meeting 

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