A new Coen caper, Hermione’s directing debut, ENO’s strike battle, and revolution in the music industry. Marianka Swain previews an action-packed week on theartsdesk
theartsdesk.com

03/03/2016

Pick of the Week: by Marianka Swain


The Oscars have finally been awarded – read Matt Wolf’s assessment – but Hollywood’s self-regard shows no sign of abating. This week, the Coen brothers bring us Hail, Caesar!, a star-packed caper set during cinema’s Golden Age, and there’s also a chance to catch Charlie Kaufman’s Oscar-nominated Anomalisa. Meanwhile, the V&A hosts one of the art world’s leading lights with Botticelli Reimagined, which examines the Florentine painter’s enduring appeal, and the venerable ENO faces a battle to secure its legacy: Philip Glass’s Akhnaten is the first production affected by chorus strike action.
 
Noma Dumezweni will soon be synonymous with Hermione when Harry Potter and the Cursed Child opens this summer, but first up is South African drama I See You, her Royal Court directing debut. Blanche McIntyre makes a first visit to the Donmar, staging Anthony Weigh’s Welcome Home, Captain Fox!as he explained to us, it’s Jean Anouilh by way of Billy Wilder – and Alice Hamilton directs Robert Holman’s Seventies Teesside-set German Skerries at the Orange Tree.
 
Julian Fellowes is back with ITV Trollope adaptation Doctor Thorne, and there’s also a return for Akram Khan’s mythical contemporary-kathak fusion Kaash, his company first full-length work, at Sadler’s Wells. Finally, songwriter and founder of collective NewCrowd and the Girls I Rate initiative, Carla Marie Williams, talks to theartsdesk about acting as a force for change in the music industry.
 
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Marianka
 

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All This Week's Reviews

CD of the Week

Loretta Lynn - Full Circle

Loretta Lynn’s first album in over a decade begins not with a song, but a spoken word introduction: the Queen of Country Music...

DVD of the Week

Comfort and Joy

Bill Forsyth’s slice of Glasgow noir never received the praise showered upon its predecessors Local Hero and Gregory’s Girl...

 
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