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Today's Climate

02/10/2020

Justice Department Drops Antitrust Probe Against Automakers That Sided With California on Emissions

The Justice Department has dropped its antitrust inquiry into four automakers that had sided with California in its dispute with the Trump administration over reducing climate-warming vehicle pollution, deciding that the companies violated no laws, The New York Times reports.

(The New York Times)

Is Trump’s USDA Ready to Address Climate Change? There are Hopeful Signs.

After three years of sidelining climate change research and thinning its roster of scientists, the USDA announced a new, five-year scientific plan this week to help American farmers cope with the worsening effects of the climate crisis. Critics are dubious.

(InsideClimate News)

Climate Change Complicates Counting Some Alaska Native Villages For Census

Since 1960, census counting in Alaska Native villages took place in January, when the frigid weather made it more likely that villagers would be home rather than out hunting and fishing. But as temperatures in Alaska climb faster than in any other state and twice as fast as the global average, counting has become more complicated.

(NPR)

Drilling, Mining Boom Possible But Unlikely Under Trump’s Final Plan for Southern Utah Lands

The Trump administration last week finalized plans to open up 2 million acres of land in southern Utah that was formerly protected as national monuments to drilling and mining. But the more pressing climate impact may be how the move reduces the capacity for that land to act as vital carbon sinks.

(InsideClimate News)

After the Wildfires: Tourist Firms in California's Wine Country Say No One Is Coming

After the second major wildfire hit Sonoma county in three seasons, no one was ready for the weeks of power shutoffs that followed. Business owners, still reeling from the canceled bookings and loss of business during peak tourism season in the fall, are now struggling more than ever to get through the winter.

(The Guardian)

Fires and Floods: Maps of Europe Predict Scale of Climate Catastrophe

A series of detailed maps from the European Environment Agency reveal the frightening scale of possible forest fires, floods, droughts and deluges that Europe could face by the end of the century, without urgent action to adapt to and confront global heating—with some cities possibly under water.

(The Guardian)

Record Rainfall Put Out Mega-Blaze in Sydney, but Brings Flooding

The heaviest rainfall Sydney, Australia, has seen in 30 years has helped extinguish the country's raging bushfires, with only 17 still burning across the state. But the rain also brought widespread and dangerous flooding, leaving 100,000 homes without power.

(BBC)

Africa, a Thunder and Lightning Hot Spot, May See Even More Storms

Africa is experiencing bigger and more frequent thunderstorms as global temperatures rise, according to researchers at Tel Aviv University. The continent already has many of the world's lightning hot spots, with storms that can be extremely destructive and, sometimes, deadly.

(The New York Times)

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