Copy
Web Version | Update preferences | Unsubscribe
Like How Should We Think About the End of the World as We Know it? on Facebook share on Twitter
In the 11/19/2022 edition:

How Should We Think About the End of the World as We Know it?

“Yes, it’s a catastrophe,” Elizabeth Weil writes of climate change. “And no, you would not be better off if you continued to tell yourself otherwise.”

In the 14th century, the Italian poet Petrarch wrote a letter to a friend in Avignon, describing his sense of “foreboding” after an earthquake shook the foundations of Rome’s churches. “What should I do first, lament or be frightened?” he asked. “Everywhere there is cause for fear, everywhere reason for grief.” 



share on Twitter Like How Should We Think About the End of the World as We Know it? on Facebook

Is COP27 the End of Hopes for Limiting Global Warming to 1.5 Degrees Celsius?

The climate talks are going into overtime with little progress toward the emissions cuts required to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement.

SHARM EL-SHEIKH, Egypt—The COP27 climate conference in Egypt may be remembered as the moment when the world gave up on limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, the most ambitious goal set by the 2015 Paris Agreement.



share on Twitter Like Is COP27 the End of Hopes for Limiting Global Warming to 1.5 Degrees Celsius? on Facebook

Leaders and Activists at COP27 Say the Gender Gap in Climate Action is Being Bridged Too Slowly

Research increasingly shows that global warming impacts women far more gravely than men, but they are still left out of the leadership and benefits of climate change adaptation.

SHARM EL-SHEIKH, Egypt — A government official, a representative from an international Non Governmental Organization and a contractor walk into a village.



share on Twitter Like Leaders and Activists at COP27 Say the Gender Gap in Climate Action is Being Bridged Too Slowly on Facebook

Texas Oil and Gas Agency Investigating 5.4 Magnitude Earthquake in West Texas, the Largest in Three Decades

The quake was the third largest in Texas history, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. An increase in seismic activity in Texas has been linked to injecting fracking wastewater underground.

This story was first published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues. Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news.

Inspectors for the Texas Railroad Commission are investigating a 5.4 magnitude earthquake that was recorded west of Pecos near the border of Reeves and Culberson counties on Wednesday, the agency said.

The earthquake, confirmed by the U.S. Geological Survey, was the largest recorded in the state since 1995 and the third-largest in Texas history, according to the USGS National Earthquake Information Center.

The largest quake in Texas history was 5.8 magnitude recorded in 1931 southwest of Valentine, according to the USGS National Earthquake Inform



share on Twitter Like Texas Oil and Gas Agency Investigating 5.4 Magnitude Earthquake in West Texas, the Largest in Three Decades on Facebook

Copyright © 2022 Inside Climate News, All rights reserved.


Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp