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Small Steps, Many Directions:  This month, it appears that things are rolling for anti-pollution. China's economy slowing down but they are stepping up their game in water pollution on all fronts - transparency, pledges, enforcement, policy & tariffs.  Check out our review of the current crackdown on groundwater - will it work? Separately, NGOs like IPE and the Green Choice Alliance are also taking a crack at investors for investing in cement companies with pollution violations. The only fly in the ointment is the proposed amendment to the environmental law released on 25 June 2013. We take a look to see if this will indeed set China back 40 years or whether it will be shelved. Separately, banks are also taking steps to factor in water risk.  HSBC’s latest report on coal & power wiped out 26% and  45% of  value in Shenhua Energy & China Coal respectively in a scenario where China was severely constrained from a lack of water by 2030. Gas & nuclear still rely on water (as does hydro) so fuel choices are limited. Enter algae...  Pandhal, Hanotu and Zimmerman recount their cost-effective way of harvesting algae from eutrophied lakes. Could this be China’s new bio-fuel? Clean up & provide energy; two birds with one stone ... we like it. Elsewhere in China, the government is looking to tackle electronic waste. Could this be the start of removing mountains of e-waste to make the rural environment less “grim”? Perhaps the semiconductor sector may also come into the spotlight given they are huge energy and water guzzlers? Check out 8 things you should know about semiconductors and water. Globally, developments on sustainability reporting are also prevalent.  Robert Gibson gives us a run down of latest developments in integrated reporting; it is much needed as 47% of the audience polled at the Standard Chartered Earth Resources Conference are not familiar with the GRI reporting framework. 千里之行 始于足下 ...  a journey  of a thousand miles begins with a single step - as far as we're concerned, so far it's been in the right direction.
   
July Newsletter
 
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Small Steps, Many Directions This month, it appears that things are rolling for anti-pollution. China's economy slowing down but they are stepping up their game in water pollution on all fronts - transparency, pledges, enforcement, policy & tariffs.  Check out our review of the current crackdown on groundwater - will it work? Separately, NGOs like IPE and the Green Choice Alliance are also taking a crack at investors for investing in cement companies with pollution violations. The only fly in the ointment is the proposed amendment to the environmental law released on 25 June 2013. We take a look to see if this will indeed set China back 40 years or whether it will be shelved. 

Separately, banks are also taking steps to factor in water risk.  HSBC’s latest report on coal & power wiped out 26% and  45% of  value in Shenhua Energy & China Coal respectively in a scenario where China was severely constrained from a lack of water by 2030. Gas & nuclear still rely on water (as does hydro) so fuel choices are limited. Enter algae...  Pandhal, Hanotu and Zimmerman recount their cost-effective way of harvesting algae from eutrophied lakes. Could this be China’s new bio-fuel? Clean up & provide energy; two birds with one stone ... we like it.

Elsewhere in China, the government is looking to tackle electronic waste. Could this be the start of removing mountains of e-waste to make the rural environment less “grim”? Perhaps the semiconductor sector may also come into the spotlight given they are huge energy and water guzzlers? Check out 8 things you should know about semiconductors and water. Globally, developments on sustainability reporting are also prevalent.  Robert Gibson gives us a run down of latest developments in integrated reporting; it is much needed as 47% of the audience polled at the Standard Chartered Earth Resources Conference are not familiar with the GRI reporting framework. 千里之行 始于足下 ...  a journey  of a thousand miles begins with a single step - as far as we're concerned, so far it's been in the right direction.
 
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Groundwater Crackdown: Hope Springs
The economy slows down but the Chinese government moves to speed up groundwater crackdown
  Read this article →
   
Environmental Law Amendment: 40 years back?
Will the proposed amendment set back China's environmental development by forty years? Or will it be shelved?  
  Read this article →
   
Algae: The New Biofuel
Pandhal, Hanotu and Zimmerman recount their award-wining & cost-effective way of harvesting algae, possibly turning it into China’s new bio-fuel
  Read this article →
   
Moving Mountains of E-Waste
With 70% global electronic waste dumped in China, find out how China can  to solve this toxic problem through legislation & practical solutions
  Read this article →
   
8 Things You Should Know About Water & Semiconductors
How much water does it need to produce an integrated circuit? Does the sector pollute? Check out this review
  Read this article →
   
Latest Developments in Sustainability Reporting
Robert Gibson & Mark Harper gives us an update oh the latest developments in the field of sustainability reporting 
  Read this article →
   

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Reports: Government: Interest
  • Beijing's Danjiangkou Reservoir declared sewage cesspool
  • China banks on desalination in Bohai Sea to help ease water woes
  • Israel-Chicago partnership targets water resource innovations based on nanotech
  • 10-20% of vegetables in Guangdong's 9 food vegetable production centers found contaminated with heavy metals
  • China threatens death penalty for serious polluters
Hot On Weibo
  • 50 million tonnes of Grade V+ Water discharged into Hanjiang River, main water source of N-S Water Transfer Project
  • According to local media, 3,874 died from oesophagus cancer in cancer villages around Huai River in 2010, 2x higher than national average
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