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All Change: Hope Springs: March ushers in the official "all-change" of the old guard. Does the new guard mean new policies? Xi's bold statements and events leading up to this week's National People's Congress meetings  lead us to harbour hope for water pollution control. Perhaps new laws will be introduced and enforcement of existing laws tightened. Professor Wang Canfa who has been involved in the drafting and revision of over 30 national and local environmental laws, regulations and decrees talks to us about whether a "new broom sweeps clean" and in case you are rusty on government policies, check out our summary of key water policies and decrees from 2011-2013. With environmental protection at the top of the agenda for the new guard, we also take a closer look at new ways of solving old water issues such as payment for watershed services. China is already the largest provider of these services globally but also plans to be more aggressive and innovative - we take a look at how. In addition, we asked Dr. Changjin Sun, the former Director of the Centre of Ecological & Environmental Economics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences to share his views on the development of such services in China. If you are finally convinced you should get on top of water risks but don't know how, Tien Shao of the World Resources Institute walks us through why tools like the new Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas make mapping water risk as well as identifying investment opportunities easy. 
   
March Newsletter
 
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All Change: Hope Springs: March ushers in the official "all-change" of the old guard. Does the new guard mean new policies? Xi's bold statements and events leading up to this week's National People's Congress meetings  lead us to harbour hope for water pollution control. Perhaps new laws will be introduced and enforcement of existing laws tightened. Professor Wang Canfa who has been involved in the drafting and revision of over 30 national and local environmental laws, regulations and decrees talks to us about whether a "new broom sweeps clean" and in case you are rusty on government policies, check out our summary of key water policies and decrees from 2011-2013.

With environmental protection at the top of the agenda for the new guard, we also take a closer look at new ways of solving old water issues such as payment for watershed services. China is already the largest provider of these services globally but also plans to be more aggressive and innovative - we take a look at how. In addition, we asked Dr. Changjin Sun, the former Director of the Centre of Ecological & Environmental Economics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences to share his views on the development of such services in China.

If you are finally convinced you should get on top of water risks but don't know how, Tien Shao of the World Resources Institute walks us through why tools like the new Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas make mapping water risk as well as identifying investment opportunities easy. 

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New Guard: New Hope for Pollution?
Will the new guard usher in a new age of pollution control in China? We take a look at the events running up to and including this week's NPC and CPPCC meetings   
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Time to Enforce China's Environmental Law
Professor Wang gives a candid take on China's environmental laws & enforcement - past, current and future
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2011-2013 Water Policies Review
Don't know what China has been up to in water? Check out our summary of key water policies since the No.1  Document on Water
  Read this article →
   
Eco-Compensation: A Way Forward?
With US$7.4 billion invested, China leads the way in watershed protection. We look at how China plans to stay ahead with innovation
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Watershed Services in China
Dr. Changjin Sun, former Director at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, gives a 101 on China's ambitious market-based programmes for watershed conservation
  Read this article →
   
Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas 
With a water supply crisis as a top five risks facing the world, WRI's Tien Shiao walks us through how Aqueduct can help companies and investors gain perspective
  Read this article →
   

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Reports
Government  "Even animals don't dare swim in these rivers, much less officials" micro-blogger Deng-Fei 
  • Government of Weifang City offering RMB100k to whistleblow on groundwater pollution
  • Apple supplier faces sanctions from Shanghai govt for turning a local river 'milky white', killing fish
Interest
  • China's 1st desal-nuclear cogeneration plant starts operation in water scarce Liaoning
  • ADB provides US$100m to China Water Affairs group to improve water in 2nd & 3rd tier cities
  • Elsewhere, Peru rejected a mine extension permit for Newmont Mining on grounds of water pollution -  a warning for the Chinese mining sector?
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