Copy
Wishful Thinking: We want responsible and efficient use of water in China. We think our “wish” has a chance of coming true. It was not so long ago that naming a philanthropic water initiative “China Water Risk” was considered risky branding. Now everyone is talking about “sensitive issues”. Even statistics on soil pollution previously classified as “state secret” have finally been made public. Yes, the UGH factor we alluded to in last month’s newsletter on heavy metals & agriculture is now official - almost a fifth of China’s arable land is contaminated. Yet, there are reasons to remain optimistic; Debra Tan shares with us five reasons while Gao Shengda, Secretary of the China Environmental Remediation Association, tells us why cleaning up dirty soil is not an easy task. Given the public spotlight on pollution, reputational risk is at an all-time high. Edelman’s Ashley Hegland explains why there may be no choice but to tackle water issues head on while H&M shares the challenges they face in implementing water stewardship initiatives one year on. Transparency appears to be the weapon of choice of local officials, who are using Weibo/WeChat to announce the suspension of drinking water supply to China’s largest chicken farmer giving consumers access to every step of its supply chain via their smartphones. But water woes are not China’s alone. They have geopolitical implications that could destabilise Asia’s economy. Check out our key takeaways from AIDF’s Asia Water Security Summit and read why Lisa Genasci, CEO of ADM Capital Foundation, thinks Asia needs to step up with innovative ideas in philanthropy to tackle issues that could possibly derail the region. 
   
May Newsletter
 
Tapping In

Wishful Thinking: We want responsible and efficient use of water in China. We think our “wish” has a chance of coming true. It was not so long ago that naming a philanthropic water initiative “China Water Risk” was considered risky branding. Now everyone is talking about “sensitive issues”. Even statistics on soil pollution previously classified as “state secret” have finally been made public.  

Yes, the UGH factor we alluded to in last month’s newsletter on heavy metals & agriculture is now official - almost a fifth of China’s arable land is contaminated. Yet, there are reasons to remain optimistic; Debra Tan shares with us five reasons while Gao Shengda, Secretary of the China Environmental Remediation Association, tells us why cleaning up dirty soil is not an easy task.  

Given the public spotlight on pollution, reputational risk is at an all-time high. Edelman’s Ashley Hegland explains why there may be no choice but to tackle water issues head on while H&M shares the challenges they face in implementing water stewardship initiatives one year on. Transparency appears to be the weapon of choice of local officials, who are using Weibo/WeChat to announce the suspension of drinking water supply to China’s largest chicken farmer giving consumers access to every step of its supply chain via their smartphones. 

But water woes are not China’s alone. They have geopolitical implications that could destabilise Asia’s economy. Check out our key takeaways from AIDF’s Asia Water Security Summit and read why Lisa Genasci, CEO of ADM Capital Foundation, thinks Asia needs to step up with innovative ideas in philanthropy to tackle issues that could possibly derail the region. 

 

Tapping In

Pollution: 5 Reasons to Remain Optimistic
Given the recent release of depressing groundwater & soil pollution statistics, here are 5 reasons to stay optimistic 
  Read this article
   
China Lacks Experience to Clean Dirty Soil
Gao Shengda from China Environmental Remediation Association shares his views on China's soil problems
  Read this article
   
Business & Society: Building Trust
Edelman's Ashley Hegland on why businesses need to reprioritize value to include societal benefits that build trust
  Read this article
   
One Year On: H&M & Water Stewardship
Get an update on H&M's water stewardship journey. What have they done? What challenges are they facing? What's next?
  Read this article
   
AIDF Water Summit: 5 Takeaways
See our 5 takeaways from AIDF's Asia Water Security Summit ranging from exposure of GDP to water risk to key areas of improvement in the water sector 
  Read this article
   
Philanthropy: Catalysing Water for All
Lisa Genasci, CEO of ADM Capital Foundation expands on how water philanthropy in China can play a catalytic role in ensuring water for all in Asia
  Read this article
   
Tapping In
Government:  Reports:  Events: Interest: 
  • NEA calls to close 6,300 small-scale coal mines; Coal Dept Director, Ren Lixin says coal industry must transform to survive this new era
  • Hubei: Daily fines to take effect earlier in July 2014
  • Hunan: MoF to subsidise soil pollution & prevention pilot in 3 cities; experts worry over insufficient funds
  • Tianjin: To raise discharge fees on 4 major air & water pollutants from 1 July 2014
  • Heilongjiang: RMB20.9bn for water-conservation projects 
  • Zhejiang: Water scorecard pass rate raised from 65 to 120 out of 500 points
  • Lanzhou Petroleum Co. blamed for benzene tap water scare
  • Jixi, Heilongjiang: lead levels in water found at 700x national standard & mercury at 9x
  • High concentrations of 68 kinds of antibiotics have been found in major Chinese rivers
  • CRAES head says from source to tap water quality monitoring network in place by 2015
  • Alibaba asks Chinese public to map water quality with test kits
  • China's largest chicken producer opens up supply chain to smart phone users
  • US Agri Dept says China corn's import to rise from 5m to 16m tonnes by 2020
Hot on Weibo: 
  • Soil pollution, food safety fears & Lanzhou tap water scare
  • Officials use weibo to announce pollution incidents
 Sina Weibo
Contact Us:
If you have questions, please send us an e-mail at info@chinawaterrisk.org.

Address
China Water Risk
9 Queen's Road Central
Suite 2405
Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Add us to your address book