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Weather Matters: Apparently we are in for a 20-30 year cycle of more rain in northern China thanks to an oceanic cycle shift in the Pacific ocean from a warm to cool phase. This month we explore the implications of this shift on agriculture in ‘Food, Water & Weather Heading North’. Unfortunately, a wetter North comes with a drier South. Already, we are seeing the impact of this high up in the Himalayas where award-wining explorer Jeff Fuchs recounts ‘tales of water’ from the nomads who believe that “the sky is confused” and “the mountains are dying”. But does less water in the South mean that hydro could face tough weather ahead? Or should we turn to cloud seeding for relief? Debra Tan mulls the viability of hydro whilst Sophie le Clue expands on transboundary issues tied to cloud seeding. In the meantime, the debate about coal and water continues. ‘China Coal-Fired Economy Dying of Thirst as Mines Lack Water’ was Bloomberg's Top 10 most read article of the day. We believe that spending on water-in-mining will help coal-miners quench the thirst but turning coal to liquid fuel is another story... Greenpeace’s Calvin Quek explains why Shenhua’s coal-to-liquids project in Inner Mongolia could be facing significant financial and environmental headwinds given rising water risks. 
   
August Newsletter
 
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Weather Matters: Apparently we are in for a 20-30 year cycle of more rain in northern China thanks to an oceanic cycle shift in the Pacific ocean from a warm to cool phase. This month we explore the implications of this shift on agriculture in ‘Food, Water & Weather Heading North’. Unfortunately, a wetter North comes with a drier South. Already, we are seeing the impact of this high up in the Himalayas where award-wining explorer Jeff Fuchs recounts ‘tales of water’ from the nomads who believe that “the sky is confused” and “the mountains are dying”. But does less water in the South mean that hydro could face tough weather ahead? Or should we turn to cloud seeding for relief? Debra Tan mulls the viability of hydro whilst Sophie le Clue expands on transboundary issues tied to cloud seeding.

In the meantime, the debate about coal and water continues. ‘China Coal-Fired Economy Dying of Thirst as Mines Lack Water’ was Bloomberg's Top 10 most read article of the day. We believe that spending on water-in-mining will help coal-miners quench the thirst but turning coal to liquid fuel is another story... Greenpeace’s Calvin Quek explains why Shenhua’s coal-to-liquids project in Inner Mongolia could be facing significant financial and environmental headwinds given rising water risks. 
 

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Award-winning explorer Jeff Fuchs gives us a glimpse into why nomads in the Himalayas think "the sky is confused" & "the mountains are dying"
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Global weather patterns have shifted with major implications for agriculture. Find out what it means for the sector if food, water and weather are all heading North in China
  Read this article →
   
Could a shift in weather patterns mean that droughts in the normally water-rich South are here to stay?  Could this derail China's aggressive hydro expansion plans? Debra Tan expands
  Read this article →
   
Who owns the weather and the clouds, and has the right to the water contained therein? Sophie le Clue gives thought to the geopolitical risks of China's cloud seeding programme
  Read this article →
   
Greenpeace's Calvin Quek explains why Shenhua's coal-to-liquids plant in Inner Mongolia could be facing significant financial & environmental headwinds due to rising water risks
  Read this article →
   
Can China manage to balance her limited water resources & coal expansion? Debra Tan argues that a solution could lie in spending on water-in-mining technology
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Reports

Interest

  • China Water Risk referenced in Bloomberg News article ‘China Coal-Fired Economy Dying of Thirst as Mines Lack Water'
  • Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region sentenced 13 people for polluting a river with heavy metals in 2012
  • Gansu facing drinking water shortage
  • Guangzhou plans to inject RMB14 billion into cleaning up its rivers over the next three years
  • Farmers fear for crops as Southern China drought drags on
  • Sichuan: 3.73 million people affected by floods & landslides; 8,400 houses destroyed by rainstorms
  • Direct economic losses in Sichuan so far amount to US$1.46 billion

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  • Non-compliance in over 70% of China's environmental laws 
  • 49% major pollutants are discharged illegally
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